1970 Mercury Cyclone Spoiler II

In the early sixties, the rather pedestrian Comet was injected with more potential to take advantage of the performance car market that was exploding with Stock Car Racing. It was renamed the Cylone and became Mercury’s circuit racer once it received Ford’s big block V8 engine.

In and around in 1970, Ford was experimenting with new aerodynamic bodies for the Cylone similar to designs used on their King Cobra. These developments were no doubt motivated by the wing-warrior Mopars that were most unusual automobiles in NASCAR. Both the Plymouth Superbird and Dodge Daytona had a new nose and rear wing to achieve better drag coefficients and stability on the track.

What Ford stylists did,was attach an extended nose to their already potent Cyclone Spoiler II package. To be released in 1970, the updated car was going to be built in 519 road-going units to comply with NASCAR certification. However, the program was cancelled, and what few cars made it into public hands featured anything from the 290hp 351 Windsor engine to the potent 429 Super Cobra Jet.

Until recently, there was much speculation about the existence any original of any long nose Spoiler IIs. After an original specimen showed up at the Ford’s 100th anniversary celebration, accompanied by a bill of sale, many journalists had to backtrack after calling the series an urban myth.

Featuring the a 429, and being the only surviving 1970 Cyclone Spoiler, the Cyclone seen above remains as one of the most powerful and exciting Mercurys ever made.

Story by Supercars.net

In Detail

submitted byRichard Owen
engineRamair 427 SCJ
positionFront Longitudinal
valvetrain4 Valves per Cyl
displacement6997 cc / 427 in³
bore107 mm / 4.21 in
stroke96 mm / 3.78 in
power279.6 kw / 374.9 bhp @ 5600 rpm
specific output53.58 bhp per litre
torque610.12 nm / 450 ft lbs @ 3400 rpm
body / frameUnit Steel
driven wheelsRWD
f brake sizemm / in
r brake sizemm / in
transmission4-Speed Manual
gear ratios:1
top speed~160.9 kph / 100 mph
0 – 60 mph~6.2 seconds
0 – 1/4 mile~14.1 seconds