London Riots - What a crock of shite!

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Metamorphosis, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. I bet a few are, along with every other race/religion


    You lot can get a bit rowdy on eid i have seen in rusholme before, but nothing too bad
     
  2. We need to get the army in pal
     
  3. *l'army
     
  4. Who said anything about abortion? Prevent them from creating life.
     
  5. Arresting solves the current problem but it doesn't solve the real problem. Arresting them means they'll be out if a couple of days and next time when the shit hits the fan, they'll be participating in the riots/stealing again. Their lack of respect and education can't be solved by arresting them.
     
  6. Obviously taking care of 4 kids at 20 years old is very hard.

    On the other hand you're a #$%#ing retard/slut if you've got 3 kids at the age of 20. That's the main problem in that case...
     
  7. Obviously. No reasonable, well balanced person ever had 3 kids by age 20.
     
  8. #158 marcusmv3, Aug 9, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
  9. #159 Baklava, Aug 9, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
  10. On the face of it I reacted the same way, 'what are they thinking?'

    But watch it proves us wrong...
     
  11. #161 Porsche addict, Aug 9, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    They should teach police some karate so they can kick their ass.

    Why do these problems always have to be solved by giving in to them and by creating even more exceptions for everyone who can't behave like a normal human being. Not to mention it's always the hard working people who end up paying for this crap.
     
  12. Oh I wouldn't bet against that myself. I'm sure there are. #$%#ing shitbags come from all creeds and colours. Either way, they need a hole in their head.

    Haha I hate scumbags like that dude. I'm all for jamming.
     
  13. someone just needs to go karate on their asses instead.

    criminals always treated as victims here. goddamn it.
     
  14. of course, but at least it makes the riots stop.. hopefully
     
  15. they were obviously traumatised and victimised their whole lives. who would choose to live this way intentionally

    *gets in lowered honda civic*
    *turns on neons*
    *turns lil wayne up to eleven*
     

  16. we got problems of our own!
     
  17. #167 Baklava, Aug 9, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
  18. rioters should be shot them
     
  19. stop
     
  20. le foreign legion
     
  21. #171 SEABEE, Aug 9, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    heres an article identifying the REAL criminals

    http://www.alternet.org/newsandviews/article/647514/as_london_explodes_in_riots%2C_there_is_a_context_that_can%27t_be_ignored%3A_brutal_cuts_and_enforced_austerity_measures/

    As London Explodes in Riots, There Is a Context That Can't Be Ignored: Brutal Cuts and Enforced Austerity Measures


    Since the coalition came to power just over a year ago, the country has seen multiple student protests, occupations of dozens of universities, several strikes, a half-a-million-strong trade union march and now unrest on the streets of the capital (preceded by clashes with Bristol police in Stokes Croft earlier in the year). Each of these events was sparked by a different cause, yet all take place against a backdrop of brutal cuts and enforced austerity measures. The government knows very well that it is taking a gamble, and that its policies run the risk of sparking mass unrest on a scale we haven't seen since the early 1980s. With people taking to the streets of Tottenham, Edmonton, Brixton and elsewhere over the past few nights, we could be about to see the government enter a sustained and serious losing streak.

    The policies of the past year may have clarified the division between the entitled and the dispossessed in extreme terms, but the context for social unrest cuts much deeper. The fatal shooting of Mark Duggan last Thursday, where it appears, contrary to initial accounts, that only police bullets were fired, is another tragic event in a longer history of the Metropolitan police's treatment of ordinary Londoners, especially those from black and minority ethnic backgrounds, and the singling out of specific areas and individuals for monitoring, stop and search and daily harassment.

    One journalist wrote that he was surprised how many people in Tottenham knew of and were critical of the IPCC, but there should be nothing surprising about this. When you look at the figures for deaths in police custody (at least 333 since 1998 and not a single conviction of any police officer for any of them), then the IPCC and the courts are seen by many, quite reasonably, to be protecting the police rather than the people.

    Combine understandable suspicion of and resentment towards the police based on experience and memory with high poverty and large unemployment and the reasons why people are taking to the streets become clear. (Haringey, the borough that includes Tottenham, has thefourth highest level of child poverty in London and an unemployment rate of 8.8%, double the national average, with one vacancy for every 54 seeking work in the borough.)

    Those condemning the events of the past couple of nights in north London and elsewhere would do well to take a step back and consider the bigger picture: a country in which the richest 10% are now 100 times better off than the poorest, where consumerism predicated on personal debt has been pushed for years as the solution to a faltering economy, and where, according to the OECD, social mobility is worse than any other developed country.

    As Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett point out in The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone, phenomena usually described as "social problems" (crime, ill-health, imprisonment rates, mental illness) are far more common in unequal societies than ones with better economic distribution and less gap between the richest and the poorest. Decades of individualism, competition and state-encouraged selfishness – combined with a systematic crushing of unions and the ever-increasing criminalisation of dissent – have made Britain one of the most unequal countries in the developed world.

    Images of burning buildings, cars aflame and stripped-out shops may provide spectacular fodder for a restless media, ever hungry for new stories and fresh groups to demonise, but we will understand nothing of these events if we ignore the history and the context in which they occur.
     
  22. I don't know who to be upset at more? The rioters or the police who are unable to control them?
     
  23. No
     
  24. seriously Britain needs to call the army now. All of the shit I have been watching is not just scary, it's bat shit #$%#ing crazy.
     
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