Re: 7speed semi automatic?

Discussion in '2002 Ferrari F2002' started by capt dna, Aug 9, 2002.

  1. these are quotes taken from the niki lauda press inteview after he drove the jaguar r2 at valencia back in january.
    "In my time one hand was always operating the gearstick. Now you have to keep both hands on the wheel, kick the throttle, then the revs automatically go to 17,000 (before it changes up) and everything is automatic. The upshift is really amazing, it is such a smooth transmission when you change gear"
    "The downshift was even more amazing: for example you are braking down to 2nd gear from 6th, you flick four times through the gears and it is all automatic. The management system works out the speed of the car and the engine, and the downshift is so smooth it is incredible. Now you have to just concentrate on driving."
    "Mechanically, also, the start is much easier. You have to engage the sequence in the right order. Basically you engage the clutch, it gets into first gear, you push the button and all you have to do is full-throttle. In the past if you gave full-throttle it blew up the engine, but now it automatically goes to 15,000 revs, lets the clutch go and it starts. There are no spinning wheels, it is taken care of by the software." and FerrariManiac is the correct on how f1 trannies work
     
  2. Up until this year there has actually been a clutch, very small of course, being as these engines are only 2,997 cubic cm. It's actually quite simple to understand. On the back of their magic steering wheel, or in our case, racing wheel, there are "four", count'em four paddles with two on either side. The bottom paddles were used to disengage/engage the clutch, and the top paddles or even buttons on some were used to shift up or down. But on the F2002, the engineers at Team Ferrari have constructed the engine AND transmission into one more complex unit. How, you ask? Fluid dynamics, peeps! Hydraulic actuation among other things in F1 racing is not new, but relatively new. Lets just say it's old enough to be applied elsewhere among moving/mechanical parts, and intervene in order to cut those tremendous amounts of thousandth's of a second off of lap time.<!-- Signature -->
     
  3. All teams are using Automatic transmitons.
     
  4. Where are you getting this information about automatics being allowed in formula 1. The rules clearly state that automatic trasmissions are forbidden. Also they use paddles, not buttons like what Alfa Romeo make it out to be.
     
  5. IN fact, most f1 race tracks only allow the use of the 6 semi-auto gerabox, 7 speed is only an option,and btw it can make a shift in 0.01s,15 times faster than the system employed in the ferrari f360.

     
  6. I know that because the TV-stations, reporters, team managers, drivers and everyone else in the F1 circus has been talking about nothing but automatic gearboxes and traction controls for half of lasts season.
    If you refer to rules, make sure they are newer than last years 4th GP.

    Jaguar had a 6-speed last year but this year also equip their cars with a 7-speed, no matter what course you race, 7 is never too much.
    It brings you extra acceleration and the shifting is incredible fast so it won't cost you a lot of time.
     
  7. <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from JustBringIt</i>
    <b>The transmission is 7-speed (+ reverse) semi-auto but it shifts electronically without the driver having to do anything so it is effectively a fully-auto.</b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->


    You total retard. why the hell would an F1 car need a reverse gear?? it has 7 FORWARD gears, and NO reverse. The Bugatti Veyron has 7 forward gears also, but that includes a reverse, because it is meant for the road. YOU ARE A TOSSER! <!-- Signature -->
     
  8. #8 Tim851, Aug 9, 2002
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    Veyronman you're a loser:

    www.fia.com/regle/REG_TEC/F1/F1-Reglements-techniques-2002-a.pdf

    This is the Technical Reglement for the Formula One.

    There will you see that a Formula One car MUST have at least 4 forward gears and 1 (in words: ONE) reverse gear.

    It is chapter 9 where they deal with the transmission.

    Additionally no-one will find evidence there that would prohibit the use of an automatic gearbox.
     
  9. you're a retard.

    Why would a F1 car need reverse?

    Maybe in case they NEED TO BACK UP.


    THe Bugatti Veyron has a seven-speed gearbox.
    (actually, so will the Ferrari F60)
    THAT means it has seven (7) forward gears.

    PLUS a reverse gear.

    Reverse is not included in the count.
    A five-speed has five forward gears, a six-speed has six forward gears.

    Notice the pattern?

    DO you think suddenly Bugatti has decided to include reverse in that count? Just to sound fancy?<!-- Signature -->
     
  10. <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from Veyronman</i>
    <b><!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from JustBringIt</i>
    <b>The transmission is 7-speed (+ reverse) semi-auto but it shifts electronically without the driver having to do anything so it is effectively a fully-auto.</b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->


    You total retard. why the hell would an F1 car need a reverse gear?? it has 7 FORWARD gears, and NO reverse. The Bugatti Veyron has 7 forward gears also, but that includes a reverse, because it is meant for the road. YOU ARE A TOSSER! </b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->

    HA HA HA you are an idiot !!!


    Of course an F1 car has a reverse gear, in case the need to drive the car back on to the track if it spins. Its in the FIA regulation too.

    Reverse gears are usually very difficult to select (I hear that an old Mclaren gearbox had the reverse gear outside the box - no idea why and I'm not sure how it worked). This is why alot of drivers stall their cars when the are trying to recover from a spin - they end up stalling trying to engage reverse.<!-- Signature -->
     
  11. I'll be the first to admit when I'm wrong if I'm wrong but to call me a retard when you clearly don't know what you are talking about just makes you look stupid and decreases your credibility. Thanks to those guys who do know what they are talking about for realising that F1 cars do need a reverse gear.

    As for the issue of paddles or buttons, the gear changes occur with the paddles on the back of the steering wheel. The clutch for some cars (maybe all of them, I'm not sure) is also on the back of the steering wheel, underneath the gear changing paddles. They are on both sides in case it is difficult for the driver to hold one side in with the wheel turned. This may be only for the left-foot breakers in the field, I'm not sure.

    A few years ago (probably quite a few by now) there was a push to only allow stick-shifting. I think Prost and Hill were some of the more vocal supporters at the time. I think it would good in that it makes the driver do more in the car but it probably won't happen.
     
  12. <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from JustBringIt</i>
    <b>I'll be the first to admit when I'm wrong if I'm wrong but to call me a retard when you clearly don't know what you are talking about just makes you look stupid and decreases your credibility. Thanks to those guys who do know what they are talking about for realising that F1 cars do need a reverse gear.

    As for the issue of paddles or buttons, the gear changes occur with the paddles on the back of the steering wheel. The clutch for some cars (maybe all of them, I'm not sure) is also on the back of the steering wheel, underneath the gear changing paddles. They are on both sides in case it is difficult for the driver to hold one side in with the wheel turned. This may be only for the left-foot breakers in the field, I'm not sure.

    A few years ago (probably quite a few by now) there was a push to only allow stick-shifting. I think Prost and Hill were some of the more vocal supporters at the time. I think it would good in that it makes the driver do more in the car but it probably won't happen.</b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->

    Clutches were also on the steering wheels a few seasons ago, but now the boxes are semi-auto (or fully-auto, although I'm not sure ALL F1 teams use fully-auto yet ...). So the Clutch is automatically engaged/disengaged whenever the driver flicks the paddle to change gear.<!-- Signature -->
     
  13. 7speed semi automatic?

    whats with a 7speed semi automatic, that does't make much sense
     
  14. its paddle shifting. no clutch. . . so they call it semi-auto . . . 7 gears. . just because :p
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  15. retard!!! still wondering how a ford-t is made...
     
  16. It's called driver convenience. A semi-auto eliminates the clutch the paddle shift allows the driver to keep both hands on the wheel at all times. It also eliminates the possibility of mis-shifting into the wrong gear or something.<!-- Signature -->
     
  17. Actually it's a 7-speed FULL automatic gearbox with the option of manual shifting.
     
  18. Sorry, but in F1 it is SEMI-auto, not full. The driver ALWAYS does the shifting, just without a clutch, and with paddles on the steering wheel.<!-- Signature -->
     
  19. The transmission is 7-speed (+ reverse) semi-auto but it shifts electronically without the driver having to do anything so it is effectively a fully-auto.
     
  20. No JapCarsSuck (good point!):

    Since last year's 4th GP -don't remember where- they allowed traction control AND automatic gearbox. If you'd follow a race now and then (next chance on march 3rd) you'd probably see in the in-car cameras that the top team drivers don't shift anymore.
    They do have the option though to do it manually.

    God, does anyone in this forum watch the F1 regularely?
     
  21. just wanted to clear one thing up. Everybody is saying "Paddles" on the steering wheel. Paddles are on the ferrari road cars like the 360, and the new 575m, and on the BMW M3 SMG. On F1 cars, they shift with BUTTONS on the front of the steering wheel, not paddles in the back. the buttons are lined up one on top of the other, the top one is to shift up and the bottom one is to shift down!

    <!-- Signature -->
     
  22. Okay Ckris, you're making fun of us don't you?
    Look at this page, I think they got the Wheel of the Williams F1 in a picture where you will realize the paddles on the back.
    If you're not making fun you are a worthy contender for the "Post Of The Week"
     
  23. I know nothing about F1 cars...so can someone please help me out?
    Do the drives shift with their hands...(behind the steering wheel???) or with their feet...???
    Sometimes I see people shift with their feet..and sometimes with their hands..?
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  24. First of all you guys shouldn't be making fun of him cause most of you don't know what the hell your talking about. It is Semi-Auto because it is a fully manual gear box with a hydrolic clutch which engages automatic when shifting gears. Also the driver does change gears via a button(seperate for up and down shifts) but if a driver fails to change gears a computer will change them automatically.
     
  25. FerrariManiac is correct in what he just said,
    if any of you have seen the video of the mclaren f1 car racing a e55 and a a class it has an in cockpit view of the f1 car showing him change gears, the button for the gears on thic car were on the back of the steering wheel contured into the shape of the wheel, not buttons sticking out, (its about the size of the top part of your finger.

    anyways on a slightly different subject, when u hear the comentary st the start they talk about the launch sequence like its a bunch of buttons they press. does anyone actually know about this. (dont reply if your just guessing)
     

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