1961 Jaguar Mark X


1961 Jaguar Mark X

1961→1970 Jaguar Mark X

The Jaguar Mark X (Mark ten) was the top-of-the-range saloon car built by the British manufacturer Jaguar, primarily aimed at the United States market. The Mark X succeeded the Mark IX as the company’s largest saloon model.

The unitary construction body-shell was codenamed “Zenith” during development and this floor pan continued in production long after Mark X production ended, as the DS 420 Limousine. The new style, four headlamps set into rounded front fenders with a vaned grill, first appeared on the Mark X. The interior was the last Jaguar with abundant standard woodwork, including the dashboard, escutcheons, window trim, a pair of large bookmatched fold out rear picnic tables, and a front seat pull-out picnic table stowed beneath the instrument cluster. Later, air conditioning and a sound-proof glass division between the front and rear seats were added as options.

From its introduction until the arrival in 1992 of the low-slung XJ220, the Mark X stood as one of the widest production Jaguars ever built. Asked in 1972 if he thought the Mark X had grown rather too large, Jaguar chairman William Lyons, agreed that it “definitely” had: he opined that the then recently introduced and notably more compact Jaguar XJ6 was, by contrast an “ideal size”.

The substantial doors required helical torsion springs inside the door pillars to enable them to be opened from the inside with an acceptably low level of effort.

In Detail

typeSeries Production Car
production years1961 – 1970
built atCoventry, England
production18500
engineInline-6
positionFront Longitudinal
driven wheelsRWD