Lamborghini Huracan STO Feature

Best of the Current Lamborghini Model Lineup

2021 Edition

One way to describe the current Lamborghini lineup of cars is to liken it to a balanced diet of awesomeness. For those with deep enough pockets, there’s something for everyone; road-going sports cars, track-oriented supercars, limited-edition halo cars, and of course, an SUV. This lineup, this diet, has everything that could possibly be good for the body and soul.

The core supercar range for Lamborghini is still comprised of the Huracán and Aventador models. Over the past few years, there seems to have been a mandate in place to focus on improving the driving enjoyment of their cars, with both cars being more fun to drive than ever before. The Aventador SVJ continues to thrill at the highest echelons of Nürburgring-dominating performance levels, while the Huracán EVO RWD (and new STO variant) offers the most puristic interpretation of the Lamborghini experience. As the halo car, the Lamborghini Sián – spearheading the company’s “Few-Off” initiative – sits atop the roster and showcases the pinnacle of Lamborghini’s tech and innovation.

The Urus continues to inject new energy to the brand, and is exactly what you expect from a Lamborghini SUV, or any Lamborghini car for that matter. Tremendous performance, class leading dynamics and a road presence unlike any other in its class. It is also quite practical, to boot. So successful has been the Urus’ inaugural appearance, that closest rival Ferrari is already planning a retort through the release of their own SUV sometime in 2022. Game on.

Here are the best brand new Lamborghini cars you can buy today.

Lamborghini Huracán Evo RWD / STO

Lamborghini Huracan STO

Base MSRP: $3,700,000 USD

Amongst this list of very special cars, the Sián is perhaps the most special. That’s because the Lamborghini Sián is the most notable example of an automobile which uses a supercapacitor – the ‘super’ added because, well, you need a really, really big capacitor to help power a car. In this configuration, the supercapacitor collects and stores energy (primarily from regenerative braking). In certain moments (such as a launch), the supercapacitor dumps all of its energy into an electric motor which immediately and briefly adds an extra 34 hp on top of what the Sián’s 785 hp 6.5L naturally-aspirated V12 engine produces. This means that up to 819 hp is sent to all 4 wheels, with the electric motor integrated into the transmission to reduce weight and improve responsiveness.

As long as the supercapacitor keeps getting recharged – which can be achieved with just seconds of hard braking – there will always be that extra bit of power boost at the car’s beckoning. Compared to an EV battery which takes much, much, longer to fully recharge, and weighs substantially more, you might be wondering why supercapacitors aren’t the dominating technology in electric or hybrid vehicles today. Well, there are a few very important reasons for this. For one, supercapacitors aren’t able to store energy for long periods of time like a battery, making them unviable to be the primary food source for an electric vehicle… at least for now.