$500 million per helicopter...WTF?!?!

Discussion in 'Boats, Planes, Other' started by matfitz, Dec 30, 2007.

  1. #1 matfitz, Dec 30, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    http://www.antiwar.com/orig/werther.php?articleid=12128

    http://www.lockheedmartin.com/data/assets/corporate/videos/VH-71_maidenflight.wmv

    Fuselage: Made of high-strength reinforced aluminum alloy, it can withstand crash impacts in excess of 15 Gs.

    Engine: The VH-71 can shift from three 3,000-horsepower turboshaft engines to two, whereas the twin-engine Sea King must land if one engine fails.

    Rotor: Five flared rotor blades increase the craft’s efficiency by up to 30 percent over conventional designs when flying at 150-knot cruising speed.

    Defense System: The VH-71s, like the EH101s they are modeled on, will probably feature radar-warning receiv-ers, laser detectors and flare dispensers to deflect anti-aircraft missiles.

    Cabin: Measuring eight feet wide and 25 feet long, the cabin will include a lavatory and a galley kitchen. The fold-down stair spares the president from ducking during photogenic entrances and exits.

    Communications: More room for communications hardware means the president will have secure and continuous access to all White House and Pentagon computer systems and data streams.
     
  2. It doesn't actually cost $500 million per unit, that's factoring in the costs of development into the unit cost. From what I've read, the actual unit cost is $270 million, still expensive, but keep in mind, helicopters have never really been cheap to build or operate, especially when we're talking big helicopters like this.
     
  3. That was fr the original budget of $6.1b . But things have changed.

    "As of December 2007, after cost increases and schedule problems — driven in part by nearly 2,000 REQUIREMENT CHANGES (way to plan ahead guys) — the program cost ballooned to more than $11b." [8]

    $11b / 23 helicopters = $478 million each

    I think the first linked article makes a good point when they mention the value of conspicuousness. This helicopter screams "Shoot me down, come on, I'm big, fat, LOUD, expensive, and I carry some of the most hated people on earth. Come on, do it. I'm right here. I'M RIGHT F*CKING HERE, YOU PUSSY! Oh yeah, thank your kids for footing the bill on this one. "

     
  4. zomg moar expensive tha F-22`s
     
  5. Requirement changes don't necessarily mean the requirements of what the aircraft was supposed to do changed, but most likely wording in the technical specification from the purchaser was changed during the part of negotiations known as requirement management.

    TONS of requirement changes happen to every single spec and a lot of money can be lost. For just the wheels and brakes of an aircraft I worked on the requirements had probably over 100 changes.

    Also, like ChevyRocks said, that calculation you did is only for the first 23 built, and includes the research, prototyping, testing, manufacturing, etc etc etc costs. Thats more or less a "one time cost" (though not completely) and after the fact if they want more helicopters beyond the 23, each one will not cost half a billion.
     
  6. for that much money it better be able to fly into space and have a multi disc changer in the boot
     
  7. that article /website is the shittiest ever
     
  8. Yay another leftist hippy site.
     
  9.  
  10. post av
     
  11. so is this the new marine 1?
     
  12. Here is the really sad part. This helicopter already exists. Its just a version of another helicopter already in service. The cost seems excessive to develop one from scratch, but this is just to build a different version. Billions of dollars. Seems to me that a civilian version is already offered. So, you paint the #$%#er up in the white and green, send it to an upholstery shop to have a nice interior installed, and #$%#ing bingo, VIP chopper. Ever cooler, is the fact that the pentagon wants to cancel the program now, because they say its gotten to expensive. So they want to just loose all the money spent thus far. Its just amazing to me that we allow them to do things like this, over, and over, and over. We cant fund our schools, but we can throw away BILLIONS of dollars to convert a regular helicopter to a pimp chopper for his #$%#ness.
     
  13. Here is the billions of dollars version "testing", and the second pic is the existing available version. This helicopter is designed to carry people, why do you need billions to "convert" it to carry people? Something funny is going on here.
     
  14. Something funny is going on here ... you posted pictures of two DIFFERENT helicopters. They aren't the same thing.

    Picture 1: AgustaWestland EH101
    Picture 2: Sikorsky S-92

    In fact, the EH101 and the S-92 were competing AGAINST EACH OTHER for the Marine One contract, with the EH101 becoming the winner (to be designated as the VH-71A Kestral).
     
  15. antiwar.com, great site for the latest in accurate defense industry analysis!
     
  16. Here is the correct photo.
     
  17. #18 CitroenSM, Jan 9, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    There's only one good source http://www.janes.com/
     
  18. Not really.
     
  19. It actually is. That RN helicopter is the EH101, which the VH-71 is based on.
     
  20. I know, but the VH-71 isn't base off the naval version of the EH-101 photo he posted.
     
  21. Like it matters. Point is, they are spending billions to put an executive bathroom in a chopper. What a bunch of asshats.
     
  22. Yo got to be retarded to believe that from a website like anitwar.com
     
  23. #24 mattco26, Jan 16, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
  24. The problem is that they chose a base helicopter that was much too small for what they wanted it to do, so they need to upgrade and re design it to the point that its almost a new chopper. Instead of using a larger chopper like the CH-47 Chinook, cruises at 137 and has a max speed of 196mph, and can lift 23,000lbs. You could put a chinese massage parlor in this thing and it would still fly.
     

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