elise V. s2000

Discussion in '2000 Lotus Elise 111S' started by Brit cars rule, Aug 9, 2002.

  1. Re: elise V. s2000

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    They may have used a "street" tire like a Pilot sport cup that is technically a street tire but is made for track day events.
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    Ah, you mean one of those tires that is technically street-legal but has the consistency of a pencil-eraser. Great for grip but you need a new set every time you change the oil in the car. Something like that?


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    If I could get a TVR, I live in the US and they aren't allowed here, I would get a Tuscan.
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    Yeah, so would I. I'm an American living in England at the moment. I rented a Tuscan for a week, put about 400 miles on it and was in hog-heaven every inch of the way.

    If you really love TVRs you should try to do that. Come to the UK on vacation and spend part of it in a TVR. What I'd recommend is that you spend about three weeks here. The first two weeks, you rent a normal car so you can get used to the whole "driving on the other side of the road/car" thing. That took me about a week or so when I first did it.

    Then, once you've gotten use to things and found some nice places to drive (I recommend the Northwest - fly into Manchester and then spend your time exploring the Peak District, Lake District and Yorkshire. Great scenery and plus Blackpool is a short detour on your way to the Lake District and TVR reportedly give factory tours) then you go pick up the Tuscan. If you like sports cars, you owe it to yourself to drive a 4.0 liter Tuscan at least once in your life. There is nothing like it.

    BTW, if you *really* want a TVR, there are ways to get them into the states - either temporarily or permanently.

     
  2. Re: elise V. s2000

    I really wanted a Tuscan. I looked pretty hard on getting one in the US. I have a friend who has a relative shipping cars for Nisaan from Germany. I was going to ask him to ship one but I have heard of many people trying that and getting caught. I have even seen articles on people trying to ship a Tuscan in peices and they caught that. I don't have the dough to risk buying a car that gets permanently impounded, and they seem to catch everything. Also, I live in Ohio. Unlike LA or Miami I think a TVR would stick out and the cops might notice it. They are planning on working out things with the trade comission and selling TVR's here in the next couple of years. I'll just wait.
     
  3. Re: elise V. s2000

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    I have even seen articles on people trying to ship a Tuscan in peices and they caught that.
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    You don't have to go to that much trouble. A non-American can bring any car in they like for up to a year without having to do a thing to the car. Isn't it funny that non-Americans have freedoms that us local folk don't have?

    All you'd have to do is get someone in England or Europe who'd be willing to bring one over for you.

    You could buy a used one, bring it over for a year, then ship it back and sell it again and it probably wouldn't cost much more than leasing a Viper for a year.

    The only problem is that you'd have to either have to learn to drive a RHD car if you went shopping in England or else put up with higher depreciation and less selection if you held out for a LHD car from The Continent.




     
  4. Re: elise V. s2000

    I didn't know that. I still think that I might wait. I would be able to get my friend to buy it and bring it over but there is no way I would every be able to send that car back after a year. I am a sport sedan man and I couldn't even give back my M Roadster after 3 years. I will have to see what the regulations for buying a used TVR would be if they start selling them in the US next year. I guess they are already making agreements with US dealers. I was thinking, could we possibly be more off topic for this thread?
     
  5. Re: elise V. s2000
     
  6. Re: elise V. s2000

    Nope you couldn't apart from the nation i suppose.
     
  7. Re: elise V. s2000

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    I still think that I might wait. I would be able to get my friend to buy it and bring it over but there is no way I would every be able to send that car back after a year.
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    You'd almost have to send it back because it would be ready for a service by the time you put a year's worth of driving on it and you'd have a difficuly or impossible time having it worked on in the states.

    What you do it send it back, have it serviced and than bring it back again. The whole process wouldn't take more than a couple of weeks tops.


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    I will have to see what the regulations for buying a used TVR would be if they start selling them in the US next year. I guess they are already making agreements with US dealers
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    I wouldn't hold my breath for that. This rumor has been floating around for some time and has yet to be proved true. Fact of the matter is that the money it would cost for TVRs to be certified for road use in North America and then the additional money it would cost to set up dealership and service centers would add so much to the cost of the cars that it wouldn't be practical for TVR to do it. Who would spend $200,000 on a TVR? Certainly not enough people to make it worth TVR's while to take the leap.

    Peter Wheeler (head of TVR) was once quoted as saying that if someone wanted to give him £25 million, he'd be happy to start selling his cars in North America again. That's about what it would cost to set up things so it would be practical for all concerned. A company who makes 800-1000 cars every year cannot absorb the cost of doing business in the US and Canada. Put another way, the only reason the Dodge Viper exists is that Chrysler has the ability to spread the cost of developing such a specialty vehicle over lots of other "commodity cars".

     
  8. Re: elise V. s2000

    I guess there was a big stink with TVR and the US trade commission. TVR didn't want to be told how to build cars and they wouldn't comply with any of the commissions requests for safety measures (like air bags). Because of the popularity that TVR has gained from Gran Turismo and the movie Swordfish, they realize that they have a large enough market in the US to warrant certain safety measures be desinged in the next generation Tuscan and the Tamora to meet regulations. I think they are currently kissing trade commission ass to get allow in the country while their popularity is still high. Last winter they had a dozen dealership agreements in place as soons as issues were resolved. It seems like they are really trying.
     
  9. #34 helmettt, Jul 11, 2004
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
  10. Re: elise V. s2000

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    I guess there was a big stink with TVR and the US trade commission. TVR didn't want to be told how to build cars and they wouldn't comply with any of the commissions requests for safety measures (like air bags). Because of the popularity that TVR has gained from Gran Turismo and the movie Swordfish, they realize that they have a large enough market in the US to warrant certain safety measures be desinged in the next generation Tuscan and the Tamora to meet regulations. I think they are currently kissing trade commission ass to get allow in the country while their popularity is still high. Last winter they had a dozen dealership agreements in place as soons as issues were resolved. It seems like they are really trying.
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    Where did you hear this?

    I ask because TVR has repeatedly insisted that they won't put airbags in their cars because they are safer without airbags. Ditto for ABS and traction-control.

    They'll have a hard time selling many cars in the US without these cheesy gimmicks so what would be the point of even trying?
     
  11. Re: elise V. s2000

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    I guess there was a big stink with TVR and the US trade commission. TVR didn't want to be told how to build cars and they wouldn't comply with any of the commissions requests for safety measures (like air bags). Because of the popularity that TVR has gained from Gran Turismo and the movie Swordfish, they realize that they have a large enough market in the US to warrant certain safety measures be desinged in the next generation Tuscan and the Tamora to meet regulations. I think they are currently kissing trade commission ass to get allow in the country while their popularity is still high. Last winter they had a dozen dealership agreements in place as soons as issues were resolved. It seems like they are really trying.
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    Where did you hear this?

    I ask because TVR has repeatedly insisted that they won't put airbags in their cars because they are safer without airbags. Ditto for ABS and traction-control.

    They'll have a hard time selling many cars in the US without these cheesy gimmicks so what would be the point of even trying?
     
  12. Re: elise V. s2000

    I read this info in European car when the were covering the Tamora that was coming out at the time. The article made it sound like several years ago TVR wouldn't budge on any of the issues that the trade comission had with their cars. It was like they both said F you to one another. It seemed that TVR sees a viable market in the US and isn't planning on setting up sales by shipping over converted models that they are already producing, but meeting the trade comission half was on some issues on the Tamora to better relations. After that they planned on having the next generation Tuscan be more suited to US regulations. The buzz about the company from games and movies in a car crazy country like the US couldn't be ignored. It definelty would be to expensive to modify the current Tuscan to meet regulations and ship it over, but if they worked certain features into the next generations developement it shouldn't affect cost too much,
     

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