Ferrari – Leggenda e Passione, may,20

Discussion in 'Events' started by ajzahn, Mar 28, 2007.

  1. #1 ajzahn, Mar 28, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
  2. what idiots
    that's the same dates as the Mille Miglia
    well at least potential buyers could come over on sunday after the MM

    but why on earth are they not holding the auction 1 month later during the Ferrari 60 Years
     
  3. #3 ajzahn, May 1, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    Ferrari 288 GTO
    Gran Turismo Omologato

    With less than three weeks to go before the RM ‘Leggenda e Passione’ auction - at Maranello on 20th May - Classic Driver was given an exclusive preview of one of the entries in the sale - a car with just over 1200 km ‘on the clock’, and of the type that started the mid-engined ‘super-Ferrari’ series that reached its pinnacle with the Enzo: a 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO.

    Approaching the car it’s easy to feel familiar with the shape, as it shares many styling cues with a contemporary model in the Ferrari range, the similarly Pininfarina-designed 308/328 series. However, take a closer look and the differences soon become apparent: the 100mm longer wheelbase, much wider front and rear wheel arches that cover 8" and 10" alloys, and extra vents that allow air in and out of an engine compartment housing a longitudinally-mounted 2855 cc 400 HP twin-turbo V8 with two Behr air-to-air intercoolers.

    At the front the grille is dominated by four driving lights, and the rear of the car is wide and slatted, with a spoiler beautifully integrated into the aluminium and carbon-composite bodywork above the four circular lights. An imposing view to the many other cars overtaken by a 288 GTO in full flight. Inside the car, Ferrari’s traditional black leather interior is enlivened in this example by bright red cloth inserts (most cars were all-black), and the rifle-bolt gearchange gate houses a tall wand of a gearlever, a nod (like the three slats on the rear wheel arches) to its namesake, produced a little over twenty years earlier.

    ‘GTO’, three little letters signifying a car meant for the track, a homologation special designed to get round contemporary regulations and give Ferrari’s customers the very best tool for competition. Intended as an FIA Group B contender, of which 200 examples had to be made, the 288 GTO never had the on-track success of its 1960s’ ancestor, but it was far more popular; production ending after some 270 cars were delivered to eager collectors worldwide.

    RM’s red example (the other in the auction is a yellow ‘prototipo’) was a European-spec car originally delivered to the Ferrari dealer in Toronto, Canada, for his own collection. Following his death in 1994, the car remained dormant in his estate. Having covered just over 1200 km in its 22-year life, the car is catalogued as understood to being in ‘top condition’, and looked superb, just prior its shipment to Italy for the Sale.

    The engine started on the button (yes, there is a black rubberised starter), and the Ferrari driving position of reclined seat and shallow-raked steering wheel is typical of the period - unusual for those used to modern supercars, yet comfortable with a little adaptation. A lightish clutch and positive gear change would mean long country drives or track work becoming a real joy, but you’re not probably going to use this to go to work or on holiday - it’s a (very) special occasion machine.



    Just like a modern day Enzo but - to borrow a quote from a specialist classic car magazine - it ‘looks a million dollars, costs a third of that’. With Enzo values approaching $1.25m and this car's estimate of EUR 325,000 - EUR 375,000 (or around $480,000), it’s a handy yardstick and not so far wrong today.

    And unlike the F40, of which nearly 1,300 were produced, it’s a genuinely low-production model that looks much better than an F50.With its ability to spin tyres at over 100 mph, it can also offer blistering performance that still excites today.

    Like the later Enzo, the 288 GTO embodied many technical innovations from contemporary F1 (it was launched in 1984, the era of 650+ HP turbo cars), and at the time - and later - became a favourite road car of the Scuderia's drivers such as Alboreto, Schumacher and Irvine. If it's exciting for them to drive, how good can it be for the rest of us?

    Like all cars in the Maranello sale, the car comes with the Certificate of Authenticity issued by Ferrari Classiche. For further details on the car please click here:
    >>> www.classicdriver.com/uk/find/4100_results.asp?lCarID=1750739

    To see a full lotlisting of entries to the May 20th ‘Leggenda e Passione’ auction please click here:
    >>> www.classicdriver.com/uk/find/4100_results.asp?lCarID=1750739

    Auction Schedule:

    SALE
    May 20, 2007 - 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
    1:00 pm Memorabilia
    3:00 pm Automobiles

    PREVIEW
    May 18, 2007 - 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
    May 19, 2007 - 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
    May 20, 2007 - 9:00 am - 1:00 pm

    Admission to this event requires the purchase of an official auction catalogue available for EUR 65 (plus S&H). The catalogue admits two and must be presented at the entrance to the sale to be granted entry.


    RM Auctions in association with Sotheby's
    34-35 New Bond Street
    London W1A 2AA
    UK
    Telephone during Sale: +39 0536 193 5019

    >>> www.rmauctions.com
     
  4. Ferrari 340 /375 MM ex-Scuderia Ferrari team car, ex-Paolo and Giannino Marzotto, Umberto Maglioli, Piero Carini, Luigi Villoresi, Nino Farina, and Mike Hawthorn, fifth overall at Le Mans, and 24 Hours of Spa winning,

    An exclusive auction at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, where the legend was born, dedicated exclusively to the most superb road going and racing Ferraris, as well as many virtually irreplaceable lots of Ferrari memorabilia.

    Ferrari has been called a racing company with a production department, and nowhere is that emphasis more evident than in the case of the company’s production sports cars of the early 1950s. Not only was Enzo Ferrari passionately dedicated to pursuing victories on the world’s Grand Prix circuits, but his sports cars – which were supposed to fund the operation – quickly became dominant racers in their own right.

    Of course, there was method to the madness. Sports cars earned both starting and prize money for the Scuderia, but their success on the track meant that they could then be cleaned up and sold to a waiting list of gentleman racers and any number of serious sports car racing teams.

    The 340/375 MM

    The heart of the 340 MM and 375 MM cars was their engines. Designed by Aurelio Lampredi, a superbly talented engineer, they were intended to provide a large displacement alternative to the original Colombo-designed V-12. Although the initial intent was to provide an entry for the naturally-aspirated 4.5 litre Grand Prix class, the engine’s broad power band and rock solid reliability made it an ideal weapon for sports car racing in a variety of displacement configurations.

    The 375 MM’s Lampredi engine was an all aluminum expression of the art of the foundry. Designed for durability, it featured seven main bearings, single overhead camshafts with roller followers and hairpin valve springs and dual magneto ignition. It breathed through a trio of beautiful four-choke Weber 40IF4/C downdraft carburetors – one venturi per cylinder. The four-speed fully synchronized gearbox was mounted to the engine, driven by a multi-plate clutch. Everything was built for strength and reliability.

    The 340/375 MM’s chassis was conventional Ferrari, based on two parallel oval tubes in a welded ladder structure. Front suspension was independent by parallel unequal length A-arms with a transverse leaf spring, sway bar and Houdaille hydraulic shock absorbers. The usual Ferrari solid rear axle with semi-elliptic springs, Houdaille shocks and parallel trailing arms (for location and taking braking and acceleration loads) was both well proven and reliable.

    The cars were brutally powerful, and soon proved their worth on long, high-speed tracks where their torque and power gave them tremendous speed, but where their weight and period brakes didn’t handicap the cars against smaller and more nimble competition. On the track, these Ferraris were not for the faint of heart. Challenging to drive, they also responded well to a skilled pilot. The chassis’ tendency to understeer could be counteracted by the limitless oversteer available under the driver’s right foot.

    0322 AM – Victory, Endurance, and Survival

    According to factory records, 0322 AM was completed in June of 1953 as a 340 MM and sent immediately to France as a factory entry for the 21st running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans on June 13th. Driven by the Marzotto brothers, Paolo and Giannino, 0322 AM finished fifth overall – the highest place finish for a Ferrari that year.

    Next, 0322 AM was off to the Rheims 12 Hour race, driven by Umberto Maglioli and Piero Carini. Unfortunately, the car was disqualified while leading for running without lights while it was still too dark.

    Following the race, the car was returned to the factory where it was upgraded to 375 MM specifications. An increase in stroke raised displacement to 4.5 litres from 4.1 litres. At the same time, a number of body modifications were carried out to improve cooling and aerodynamics. A lower grille was fitted, and the headlights were lowered and moved back, covered with Perspex lenses. The large rear window opening was filled in and a much smaller rear window fitted in order to keep the car cooler and reduce glare during night driving. Fresh air intakes were added to the rockers, and the brake cooling ducts and wheel clearance blisters were revised.

    By July 25th, all the modifications had been completed, and 0322 AM – now a full 375 MM - entered the 24 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps, driven by Nino Farina and Mike Hawthorn, who took the checkered flag for first overall. Barely two weeks later, 0322 AM won again, this time at the Circuit of Senigallia, with Paolo Marzotto driving. Just one week later, the car was the factory entry at the Pescara 12 hour race, where it was a dnf, driven by Marzotto and Luigi Villoresi. On August 30th, it was entered in the 1000 km race at the Nürburgring, but failed to start.

    On October 7th, a certificate of origin was issued, and on the 9th the car was officially delivered to Tullio Pacini, the Ferrari dealer in Rome. By November 19th, 0322 AM was in the hands of Franco Cornacchia’s Scuderia Guastalla in Milan.

    The Scuderia immediately shipped the car to Mexico for the November 19th running of the Carrera Panamericana, with Guido Mancini and Fabrizio Serena, who brought the Ferrari home in fourth overall – a remarkable achievement.

    The following year the Ferrari was bought by Marty Christensen of Racine, Wisconsin, who put Dick Irish behind the wheel. Together they raced a number of events, including Watkins Glen on September 18th, 1954, where Irish brought 0322 AM home in fourth overall. On November 6th, they raced at Riverside in California, finishing seventh overall.

    In 1955, Christensen tried unsuccessfully to find a buyer – for a two-year-old Ferrari! Finally, in 1956, he donated the car to the University of Wisconsin engineering department. Apparently they couldn’t figure out what to do with it either, and in 1958 they sold it to John Norsym of Chicago, Illinois.

    Norsym didn’t own 0322 AM for long before advertising it for sale in the January 1959 issue of Road & Track, which is presumably when it sold to George Bell of Chicago, who drove the car to California. Sometime around 1965, Bell sold the Ferrari to Roy Behrens, of Long Beach CA, where it was registered on California plates numbered KIS 684.

    In August 1968 0322 AM was again offered for sale in Road & Track, restored, for $6,500. In 1972 the car was owned by Kirk White Motorcars, who sold it to Dudley Cunningham of Concord, Massachusetts. Cunningham kept the car for two years before selling it to Ernest D. Beutler of Detroit, Michigan in 1974.

    Beutler kept the Ferrari until 1984 when he sold it to Swiss collector Albert Obrist, who commissioned Fantuzzi to conduct its first comprehensive restoration. The car remained with the Obrist collection until it was acquired by Formula 1 organizer Bernie Ecclestone in 1995.

    In March of 1998, Ecclestone sold the car to Seattle collector John McCaw, who kept it for just a few months before selling it to well-known Ferrari collector Jon Shirley of Medina, WA. Shirley used the car in several events, including the Colorado Grand, the Mille Miglia, and the California Mille.

    In 2003/2004 Jon Shirley commissioned noted Ferrari specialist Butch Dennison to conduct an exhaustive professional restoration, returning the car to its 1953 Carrera Panamericana configuration and livery. An extensive file of restoration invoices totaling more than $325,000 accompanies the car – along with an extensive photo archive and dossier of historical information – and its FIVA passport.

    The quality of the restoration is attested to by its first in class award at Pebble Beach. Its accuracy is proven by its Ferrari Club of America Platinum award – the highest accolade possible in Ferrari concours judging. Furthermore, its winning pedigree has continued with the award of the Chairman’s award at the 2007 Amelia Island Concours d’ Elegance – presented by none other than the legendary Derek Bell.

    More importantly, the car’s heritage as a Ferrari competition car – lies in its performance, not its beauty. 0322’s Coppa Bella Macchina award demonstrates its ultimate performance as a street car – a stringent driving evaluation that ensures, among other things, that everything works as the factory intended.

    Most important of all, however, is the Coppa GT award earned by Jon Shirley, for demonstrating 0322 AM at speed on the track at Laguna Seca. After all, what good is a race car if you can’t exercise it on the track?

    Summary

    In an article published in Cavallino #146, Alan Boe writes “0322 was the highest placed Ferrari in every race it completed in 1953, and it accounted for 13 of the 30 gross points Ferrari collected towards the Constructor’s Championship that year.”

    In fact, the three points awarded for Mancini and Serena’s finish in the Carrera Panamericana turned out to be the final points needed to secure the Constructor’s Championship for 1953.

    Three were built, but only two remain. Only 0322 AM won two races, competing at the world’s great venues. It is a factory team car, a sponsored entry in the Carrera Panamericana, and a successful entrant in American sports car racing. Many of the most talented drivers took the wheel of 0322 AM in its short five month career as a Scuderia Ferrari team car: Paolo and Giannino Marzotto, Umberto Maglioli, Piero Carini, Luigi Villoresi, Nino Farina, and Mike Hawthorn among them.

    Today, 0322 AM has it all - rarity, beauty, and power. More than that, it has an unblemished provenance – and an undeniable record defending the honor of the Scuderia in many of the most grueling events in the history of motor racing.
     
  5. Ferrari 330 TRI/LM The 1962 Le Mans-winning, Phil Hill/Olivier Gendebien

    An exclusive auction at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, where the legend was born, dedicated exclusively to the most superb road going and racing Ferraris, as well as many virtually irreplaceable lots of Ferrari memorabilia.

    The first car in a series is good. But the last car is best. It is inevitably refined, improved and developed. Its weaknesses have been addressed and its strengths have been enhanced.

    Technical sophistication is important, particularly if it represents a unique and successful configuration. A real, documented and important history makes it better, more so if it includes a roster of the best drivers. But most important of all is success. Commercial success is good, but success in competition is better and the overall winner of the 24 Heures du Mans is the best of all. The expression of all these attributes is the 1962 Ferrari 330 TRI/LM, chassis number 0808, offered here. The only 4-litre Testa Rossa built, it also is the last Testa Rossa and the last front-engined sports racing car built by Ferrari. Driven by the incomparable endurance racing pairing of Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien, it is the last front-engined car to capture the overall victory at Le Mans, and the Hill/Gendebien team’s epic third Le Mans win. It is, in so many important and meaningful ways, unique. The Ferrari Testa Rossa is the most famous series of sports-racing cars ever built. This is the ultimate Ferrari Testa Rossa. Its provenance is impeccably documented. It is incomparably and absolutely unique. Frequently driven by its current owner, it is “on the button” and ready to demonstrate its prowess on the track or in the most demanding, satisfying and exciting open road events.

    The Testa Rossa and Le Mans

    The Testa Rossa was already a racing success when it was introduced in late 1957 and it went on to a string of victories that are simply too numerous to describe in anything less than a book, and indeed, several have been written. But it was at Le Mans where the Testa Rossa established its reputation.

    Starting at 4 p.m., Le Mans races through the shortest weekend night of the year, at a latitude where the Midnight Sun is not an abstraction. It frequently drenches its competitors with rain. Sunrise comes early, only to remind competitors that the race is barely half over. Scion of the original French Grand Prix, it is the last great road race on closed public roads. Scuderia Ferrari built its best Testa Rossas for Le Mans, winning in 1958 (Hill/Gendebien, s/n 0728), 1960 (Frere/Gendebien, TR 59/60 s/n 0772/0774), 1961 (Hill/Gendebien, TRI61 s/n 0794) and 1962 (Hill/Gendebien with 330 TRI/LM s/n 0808).

    The Scuderia Ferrari Testa Rossas evolved in four distinct generations after the two 290 MM- and 500 TRC-based prototypes. The while the prototype, S/N 0666 had a deDion rear suspension, the other 1958 cars had live rear axles, left-hand drive and were bodied by Scaglietti with pontoon fenders. They were followed by a series of TR59s, now with envelope bodies designed by Pininfarina and constructed by Fantuzzi. The TRI60 followed, with similar bodies but now with independent rear suspension, indicated by the “I” (“Independente”) in their designation. They were superseded by the TRI61s, again bodied by Fantuzzi but now with the twin nostril nose carried over from the Scuderia’s GP cars and taller, squared-off tails with the ducktail spoiler which Ferrari’s empirical testing had found successfully improved performance and stability. The fifth and ultimate iteration of the Scuderia Ferrari Testa Rossas was not a “generation” at all, it being the unique 330 TRI/LM offered here.

    330 TRI/LM s/n 0808

    The CSI and A.C.O. restructured rules and classifications for 1962, placing their emphasis upon GT cars and eliminating the 3-litre sports-racing class which the Testa Rossas had dominated. However, the displacement limit for GTs was increased to 4 litres and a new Experimental category was added with a 4-litre displacement limit. Ferrari’s current sports-racers were by now mid-engined and V6 or V8 powered but Ferrari decided to create the ultimate Testa Rossa for the Experimental category, the 330 TRI/LM. It had been thought for years that Ferrari based the chassis of the 330 TRI/LM on the modified frame of 250 TRI60/61 s/n 0780, however records recently discovered at Ferrari make it clear this was not the case.

    Invoicing from Ferrari's frame supplier, Vaccari, reflecting the construction of a new frame specifically for the 4-litre 330 TRI/LM project show that 0808 was built on its own chassis, the same one still fitted, designed specifically to take advantage of the opportunity presented by the new rules – and to win LeMans. Not only built as the last Testa Rossa but also the last front-engined Ferrari sports racer of any kind, Ferrari's concept for the 4-litre 330 TRI/LM and determination that it would be a serious challenger for the Experimental category and overall wins is clearly demonstrated by the decision to make the 330 TRI/LM a completely new, purpose-built car to carry the 4-litre engine.

    The 4-litre Lampredi V-12 was some 4” longer than the 3-litre Colombo engines for which the Testa Rossa chassis was designed, so the new frame was made longer than the standard 3-litre Testa Rossa - but by only 2¾” to retain the car’s balance. At the same time it was made extra strong to handle the additional power and torque of the bigger engine. The standard TRI61 5-speed gearbox was also augmented with stronger gears; the suspension was the all-independent, coil spring design which had proven its robust road holding in the TRI 60 and 61. Given the chassis number 0808, Ferrari installed an extensively modified Tipo 163 Superamerica V-12 that closely pressed the 4-litre maximum with 3,967cc. With special Testa Rossa-style free-breathing cylinder heads, big valves and six 2-barrel Weber 42 DCN carbs, the big V-12 was tuned to give 390 horsepower for the race, at least 50 more horsepower than the best of the earlier Scuderia Ferrari Testa Rossas had ever had.

    In the 330 TRI/LM Ferrari distilled all its experience with four years of building and racing Testa Rossas into its ultimate expression, built with one objective: to win the 24 Heures du Mans.

    Fantuzzi created the longer body which Phil Hill described in his October 1982 Salon feature on this car in Road & Track magazine as, “… a combination of the old Testa Rossa shape, but with the double nostril nose and the cutoff tail-with-a-spoiler that were used on the mid-engine cars. Behind the cockpit was an airfoil; while ahead of us was a full wraparound windscreen that blended into side windows…. With the perspective of years its shape seems almost perfect.”

    Continuing from Phil Hill’s Road & Track Salon article, “… Testa Rossas were the reason Ferrari was able to dominate sports car racing in much of the world, and produce some of the most beautiful sports racing cars of the postwar era. In 1962 … the TR lineage was about to end and the 330 [TRI/LM] became the last Testa Rossa. Seen from that view, the big car’s lines look even better, flowing yet tough, the graceful shape only interrupted when necessary by an air scoop, a bonnet handle or a leather strap … the rounded looks-good-to-the-eye shape of the Fifties ending at the scientific cutoff Kamm tail of the Sixties.”

    Arriving late at the Le Mans Test Day, April 9-10, the 330 TRI/LM was tested only on the second day’s session. Hampered by rain, Willy Mairesse nevertheless turned in the day’s fastest lap at 4 minutes 10.8 seconds, a remarkable accomplishment for a high powered sports-racer on a rain-slicked track and one that hinted at the 330 TRI/LM’s success to come.

    Further development followed in Maranello and the 330 TRI/LM was not entered in either of the intervening World Challenge races, the Targa Florio and Nürburgring 1000km. It arrived at Le Mans along with the other Scuderia Ferrari entries: 330 GTO/LM, Dino 268 SP and Dino 246 SP. They were assigned respectively to Michael Parkes/Lorenzo Bandini, Giancarlo Baghetti/Ludovico Scarfiotti and the Rodriguez brothers. The 330 TRI/LM was assigned to the proven masters of long distance racing and the Ferrari Testa Rossa, Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien.

    At Le Mans 1962 the 330 TRI/LM’s competition came from the other Scuderia Ferrari entries, a trio of 4-litre Maserati Tipo 151 coupés and several Aston Martins, but in effect there was no competition. In practice the 330 TRI/LM was a full 3½ seconds faster than anything else, that being the 330 GTO/LM. The 330 TRI/LM’s success was expressed by Phil Hill in the Road & Track salon article: “Although the 330 was something of a brute in concept, it was not a brutish car to drive. It was also a damn fast car and with it I was able to break Mike Hawthorn’s Le Mans lap record…. The independent two A-arm suspension front and rear made this a very decent-handling, well balanced car. The 330 [TRI/LM] suffered none of the earlier aerodynamic problems of some Ferraris, which caused them to lift so badly we lost much of the steering control at very high speeds. And it didn’t exhibit that schizophrenic nature of other Ferraris, when they would be nice on the tight, slow parts of the track and yet get nasty on the fast parts, like the section before the old White House turn. Without these strange nose or tail liftings the 330 was a nice, almost pleasant car to drive. “We did have one major problem. Right from the first practice session the clutch would slip when we really got on the engine near the point of greatest torque. As we’d accelerate away from White House, holding the power at that critical rpm while turning the car (which was adding to the load on the engine), the slippage began. We knew the only answer was to treat the car as gently as possible and that the moment the revs would start to mount out of proportion to the degree that the car was accelerating, we would have to sense it and shift. That oftentimes meant we were a gear higher than we cared to be at certain places on the track, but we could live with that. The unspoken thought between us, however, was that the car just couldn’t last.”

    Gendebien got away slowly at the start but used the 330 TRI/LM’s speed to advantage, slicing through almost the entire field to lead the opening lap. Through the Hill/Gendebien pair’s annual Le Mans duel with the ultra-fast Rodriguez brothers they kept the 330 TRI/LM in the lead through virtually the entire race – despite nursing the clutch – and with the retirement of Pedro and Ricardo had a 4-lap lead, which increased to five full laps at the finish.

    With this final victory for the Ferrari Testa Rossa, Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien became the first driving team to win three times at La Sarthe and Gendebien became the first 4-time winner, a stunning record compiled wholly in Ferrari Testa Rossas. 330 TRI/LM s/n 0808’s subsequent history

    Following Le Mans the 330 TRI/LM was sold to Luigi Chinetti’s North American Racing Team. Its real buyer, however, was Don Rodriguez. Having seen the car’s success firsthand he determined to put Pedro in it for the North American season. Pedro won the big car portion of the September 15-16 Double 500 at Bridgehampton in absolutely convincing style, lapping the entire field – which included Augie Pabst in Briggs Cunningham’s bellowing Maserati Tipo 151 coupé – by the race’s midpoint and proceeding to show off in ebullient Pedro Rodriguez style for the balance of the race. He then went on to the Canadian Sports Car GP at Mosport a week later, finishing 2nd. Driven by Masten Gregory at Nassau in December while Pedro was mourning the death of his brother at the Mexican GP, the 330 TRI/LM finished 4th in the Nassau Trophy.

    At Sebring March 23, 1963 Pedro Rodriguez was joined in the N.A.R.T.-entered 330 TRI/LM by 1962 F1 Driving Champion Graham Hill. Easily able to run with the mid-engined 250 P prototypes, the front-engined Testa Rossa was a contender for overall victory. At one point it built up a 3-lap lead over the pursuing P-cars but a series of mechanical and electrical problems ate away at the lead while the drivers struggled with exhaust fumes from a split exhaust manifold. Nevertheless Hill and Rodriguez made the best of a series of tribulations, only yielding second to the Mairesse/Vaccarelli/Bandini Ferrari 250 P in the penultimate hour and bringing the big Testa Rossa home in a solid third place, only two laps behind the winning Surtees/Scarfiotti 250 P.

    N.A.R.T. returned to Le Mans with the 330 TRI/LM in 1963, its power now complemented by wider tires, and once again it proved it had the measure of the Scuderia Ferrari 250 Ps and the rumbling 5-litre Maserati Tipo 151 coupés. The 330 TRI/LM ran securely in third until after midnight when the engine threw a connecting rod in the top speed section between Mulsanne and Indianapolis with Roger Penske at the wheel, creating an instant oil slick for the Testa Rossa’s wide rear tires. It crashed, and while Penske was only slightly injured the same could not be said for the 330 TRI/LM.

    Its racing career, and with it the racing history of front-engined sports-racing cars and the legendary Ferrari Testa Rossa, ended here.

    Subsequent History

    The damaged 0808 was sent back to Ferrari for repairs where it was rebodied, first as a spider and later with a unique coupé body by Fantuzzi. Shipped back to the United States, in 1965 it was sold by Chinetti to Hisashi Okada, a businessman based in New York City. Okada drove this 4-litre Le Mans-winning 330 TRI/LM for nine years on the streets of New York and its environs before succumbing in 1974 to the entreaties of Stanley Nowak on behalf of Pierre Bardinon and selling it for, among other things, a Ferrari 250LM (s/n 5845) which he similarly drove in and out of New York City until 1993.

    Upon acquiring 0808 Pierre Bardinon immediately commenced a complete restoration to its 1962 Le Mans configuration including commissioning the original coachbuilder, Fantuzzi, to re-create its work of 1962. Despite the engine failure at Le Mans in 1963, the 330 TRI/LM still has its original engine. Stamped 0808 with numero interno 46SA, this has been confirmed as the original engine by Ferrari. Completed to a very high standard under the supervision of the experienced staff at Pierre Bardinon’s Mas du Clos collection, it took its place among a peerless collection of some of the world’s finest Ferraris.

    Perhaps the best demonstration of the continuing allure and potency of this unique, final Testa Rossa came several years ago when 0808 and Phil Hill were reunited at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Nearly forty years after setting the lap record and winning Le Mans by five laps, Hill and the 330 TRI/LM teamed up again on the Goodwood hill climb course, trouncing such later and competently driven opposition as David Piper’s 330 P4 and the Chaparrals.

    Since being acquired in 2002 by the present owner, 0808 has led an active life as part of a small, exclusive collection of the finest and most important sports and sports-racing cars.

    Unlike most cars of this importance, history and value, it has been frequently driven. Its first outing was the 2003 Colorado Grand where it performed flawlessly. In 2004 it was appropriately the centerpiece of the display of significant Ferrari race cars at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. In 2006 it carried its owner on a flawless and satisfying Copper State 1000 until suffering a tire puncture three miles from the finish.

    In the meantime it has even been used frequently for commuting in city traffic, recalling Hisashi Okada’s many years commuting in New York and making 0808 surely the only Le Mans winning Ferrari to serve two owners as a commuter car.

    Throughout its recent history of regular use and enjoyment it has been assiduously maintained regularly by the same experienced mechanic to be always ready for instant use. Recently it had a complete mechanical refurbishing at Wayne Obry’s Motion Products with the explicit charge that 0808 receive everything mechanically that it needed – or wanted – to be ready for the 2007 Copperstate 1000. That work was completed in mid-March of 2007 and it has been driven only on shakedown runs since.

    Some of the finest and most significant sports and sports-racing cars in the world have passed through the current owner’s hands in recent years. He has used each of them regularly, frequently and enthusiastically in his effort to experience their unique, individual physical and emotional sensations. He is effusive in his praise for the Ferrari 330 TRI/LM, describing it as “the best driving experience I’ve ever had…. It is extremely drivable, yet very, very fast.”

    “I don’t collect cars, I use them. This particular car is the all-round best driving experience I have ever had. Speed, power, open air, sound and exclusivity with virtually unmatched race history, it has everything.”

    Summary Ferrari 330 TRI/LM s/n 0808 is the last front-engined Ferrari sports-racer, the highest development of the most famous series of racing cars in history and by far the fastest. By Phil Hill’s own evaluation the 330 TRI/LM is a well-balanced and predictable race car under the most demanding conditions. It is absolutely unique, historic, and the last front-engined car to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Repeatedly proven not only at Le Mans and Sebring but also in daily driving and on open road historic events, it is the final expression of the golden age of front-engined sports-racers, the ultimate Ferrari Testa Rossa.

    Carefully and sympathetically restored to its 1962 Le Mans-winning configuration, bodied by Fantuzzi who created its original coachwork, powered by its original engine and capable of showing its heels to the best mid-engined sports-racers of the late Sixties, it is quite simply the most important Ferrari ever offered for public sale.
     
  6. Ferrari Formula 1 F310B ex-Michael Schumacher, Monaco and Spa winner

    An exclusive auction at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, where the legend was born, dedicated exclusively to the most superb road going and racing Ferraris, as well as many virtually irreplaceable lots of Ferrari memorabilia.

    After many years without much Formula 1 success, Ferrari approached the 1996 season with a freshly designed car, called the F310, and a young talent named Michael Schumacher. The F310 was powered by a 3-litre V-10 engine, the first-ever 10-cylinder fitted to a Ferrari. It wore a nose that was low-slung although the rest of the field had abandoned that theory in favor of the aerodynamic theory that it should sit high. The man behind this project was none other than chief designer, John Barnard. He was no stranger to Formula 1 or Ferrari, but as the season unfolded it was clear that his F310 showed promise, but needed further development.

    Michael Schumacher had no trouble getting comfortable on his new team and scored outright wins in Spain, Belgium and Italy. Unfortunately, his partner, co-driver Eddie Irvine, struggled with retirements in ten of sixteen races. In the end, Ferrari was second and it was Williams-Renault who held the title. As the season unfolded with disappointment, Ferrari replaced Barnard with Ross Brawn and Rory Byrne.

    For 1997, Ferrari had assembled the team of Schumacher, Brawn and Byrne, who by 1999 would win their first of an amazing six straight constructors’ championships for Ferrari. Brawn and Byrne quickly went to work on the F310 and prepared a more developed version for the 1997 season called the F310B. Aerodynamics and reliability were improved, but still the F310B had a difficult time against the Williams-Renault FW19. The final result of the 1997 season will forever be controversial, but it is widely believed that Michael Schumacher, knowing he was the better driver, but in an inferior car, blocked title challenger Jacques Villeneuve in frustration when he tried to pass him to victory.

    The F310 and F310B won an impressive eight Grands Prix, 22 podiums, 7 pole positions and 172 points. It was at the genesis of the Ferrari’s most important time in modern racing and set the tone for the F300 which would also take the championship to the final round in 1998.

    The example presented here, F310B chassis 175, was driven to victory in Monaco and Spa that year by Michael Schumacher. Since being retired from racing and sold by the factory, it has formed a prominent part of two important U.S. collections. It has seen expert care and limited use. A recent discussion with Ferrari of Houston, which has cared for chassis 175, revealed that it is on the button and ready for track-use. Furthermore, with the factory’s Corsa Cliente program, it is possible to experience the thrill of a modern Formula 1 car, with the race support and backup previously available only to front line drivers.

    With the Scuderia’s undeniable and unprecedented success in the past ten years, combined with the recent retirement of the legendary Michael Schumacher, this important car from the dawn of the “age of Ferrari” in modern F1 racing is now, and will forever be, highly sought after by fans of the marque – and the man.
     
  7. Ferrari 599 One Of Two Examples To Complete The Ferrari Panamerican 20,000

    An exclusive auction at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, where the legend was born, dedicated exclusively to the most superb road going and racing Ferraris, as well as many virtually irreplaceable lots of Ferrari memorabilia.

    The Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano represents an artful blend of Ferrari’s famous front-engined V-12s from the past and a great deal of the modern technology found in their road and race cars. It seems fitting that the all-aluminum body was designed by none other than Pininfarina, who - although famous for many Ferrari designs - also penned the famous 365 GTB/4 “Daytona” from which the 599 clearly descends. With its long nose sloping down and short upswept tail section, a 200 mph+ top speed is reported. Aerodynamics certainly help: the vacuum created by the 599 GTB’s lower-side venturis can exceed the car’s lift by over 400 lbs. Meanwhile, the freestanding flying rear buttresses that control the airflow laterally around the 599 GTB’s curved rear glass minimize drag.

    The large and powerful 612bhp Enzo-derived V-12 is in front of the driver, however the 599 GTB is considered a front-mid-engined car. Weight distribution is actually rear-biased (47/53), due to the rearward positioning of the engine and transaxle, with 85 percent of the 599 GTB’s weight captured between the wheels. The engine sits low due to its dry-sump lubrication and smaller-diameter dual-plate clutch. With the magnetorheological shocks set to firm, the 599 GTB reportedly achieved 1.08 g on the skid pad. Mounted on the steering wheel is a “manettino” switch used to give the driver control over the car’s electronic stability and safety systems. Drivers can choose from computer-involved settings labeled “ice” “low grip” “sport” and “race.” In “race” mode, the system allows the tail to drift wide enough for maximum speed, but not more.

    In celebration of the 599 GTB Fiorano, Ferrari launched the Ferrari Panamerican 20,000, a three-month journey from Brazil to New York City. The 15-stage route would be negotiated by journalists from the around the world. The route took the Ferraris through Colombia, Panama, Nicaragua, Mexico and up to Los Angeles for the first stop in the U.S. From Los Angeles the cars went to Las Vegas, Houston, Miami, Washington D.C., Chicago, Toronto, and finally to New York City.

    The two sparkling new 599 GTB Fioranos, one finished in Tour de France blue and the other in Rosso Corsa red, departed Brazil on August 24, 2006 and arrived in New York on November 17. The endurance test was in part designed for Ferrari to showcase the 599’s overall performance, comfort and everyday usability. The press adored the cars. The two 599 GTB Fiorano were decorated with graphics inspired by the local native cultures and with the logos of the sponsors taking part in the project. As they passed through each country, the cars’ bonnets were decorated with the flag of that hosting country and its most famous symbol. The example we are pleased to offer here is the Tour de France Blue car, which flawlessly executed the 20,000 journey from Brazil to New York City. This special-liveried 599 GTB was very slightly modified to handle the rugged terrain in the toughest parts of the route. A special upgraded underbody protector made from 4 mm thick duralumin was fitted rather than plastic and the suspension set-up is slightly higher to cope with the difficult road conditions.

    The car has covered approximately 40,000kms from new whilst in the ownership of the Ferrari Factory. Presented for sale after an extensive service, the car is in perfect running condition and is ready to be enjoyed. The sister car to the car offered here today (finished in Rosso Corsa) has been shown in the Galleria Ferrari and will remain in the Ferrari factory collection. Chassis 146728 is therefore a unique opportunity to purchase, directly form the factory, one of two Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano cars to complete the Ferrari Panamerican 20,000, and the only car that will ever be released to the public – a truly unique addition to the collection of any Ferrari
     
  8. Ferrari 250 GT SWB ex-Jo Schlesser, 1,000 kms of Montlhèry third place finisher, all alloy

    An exclusive auction at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, where the legend was born, dedicated exclusively to the most superb road going and racing Ferraris, as well as many virtually irreplaceable lots of Ferrari memorabilia.

    By the late fifties it was apparent that Ferrari had perfected the dual-purpose gran turismo automobile with his line of 250 GTs. The Colombo-designed V-12 had evolved into a powerful engine. More important in racing, where it is said, "To finish first, you must first finish," it was reliable. That reliability carried over to 250 GTs that never saw the race track, creating confident and satisfied owners.

    The 250 GT Short Wheelbase Berlinetta was introduced at the Paris Show in October 1959. Built on a chassis shortened to 2,400mm and - for the first time on a production Ferrari model - fitted with disc brakes, the 250 GT SWB evidenced Carlo Chiti’s and Giotto Bizzarrini’s work on aerodynamics in a much more compact envelope. In the process, the Ferrari engineers together with Pinin Farina and Scaglietti created one of the most beautiful automobiles of all time, a succinct, straightforward and purposeful blending of form following function that excels in all aspects.

    The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta is unmistakably Ferrari. It is devoid of superfluous bulk, features or embellishments. It is aerodynamic. The driver’s visibility from the ample greenhouse is good. The corners of the car are tightly wrapped around the wheels. Its gently rounded masses speak unambiguously of potency and power.

    165 examples were constructed from 1959-1962. Scaglietti built both steel and aluminum bodies, often mixing features according to client’s wishes and manufacturing expediency. The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta is the last true dual-purpose gran turismo built in quantity by Ferrari – or anyone else for that matter. It is a milestone that marks the end of a legendary age when GT cars were driven to the greatest races, luggage unloaded, numbers applied and driven to victories.

    The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta’s list of competition successes is so long as to be pointless to recount in detail but it includes GT category wins at Le Mans in 1960 and 1961, Tour de France wins in 1960, 1961 and 1962 and of course Stirling Moss’s pair of Goodwood Tourist Trophy wins in 1960 and 1961.

    Quick, powerful, strong, lightweight, balanced, fast, responsive, reliable and, perhaps above all, indescribably beautiful, compact, purposeful and elemental, Ferrari’s 250 GT SWB Berlinetta is a high point even in Ferrari’s history of great automobiles.

    Jo Schlesser

    Jo Schlesser was a man with racing in his blood. He drove on the ragged edge, a style attested to by a litany of crashes. Each time, however, he immediately began looking for his next ride, and his persistence paid off with a wide variety of racing opportunities – from club racing and hill climbs to Grand Prix races – and eventually, Formula One.

    Born Joseph Schlesser on May 18, 1928 in the French territory of Madagascar, he did not begin racing until the age of 24. After a career driving a variety of sports cars, including 2209 GT, he began to break into the top levels of racing, participating in the 1966 and 1967 German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring, driving Formula 2 Spec Matra-Cosworths

    Unfortunately for Jo, his first Formula One opportunity came at the 1968 French Grand Prix at Rouen-Les-Essarts. Honda’s team driver, John Surtees denounced their new experimental magnesium-framed air-cooled car as a “potential deathtrap”, and declined to drive it. Schlesser, a local hero, was given the opportunity, which he accepted with characteristic enthusiasm. Unfortunately Surtees words proved prophetic, and Schlesser lost control in a fast downhill sweeper and the car hit the wall, coming to rest upside down. With a full load of fuel and magnesium structure, Jo Schlesser never had a chance. Honda, for its part, withdrew from Formula One at the end of the 1968 season.

    2209 GT – The Birth of a Legend

    2209 GT was officially sold new on October 19th, 1960 to Ardilio Tavoni of Modena, bearing Italian plate MO 60578 – although Tavoni is widely thought to have been acting for the well-known racing driver, Jo Schlesser. And indeed, the Ferrari was put to work almost immediately when it was entered in the 1000 Kms of Montlhèry just four days later, driven by Schlesser and co-driver Andrè Simon.

    A brand new car, by all reports 2209 GT performed flawlessly, and Schlesser and Simon finished a very respectable third overall. The next race of record was at Monza on March 12th, 1961, the Coppa St. Ambroeus. Driven by Sandro Zafferi, no result is recorded.

    Almost certainly other races ensued, but RM Auctions was unable to verify any that could be attributed to 2209 GT with certainty. In any event, in November of 1962 Milan native Gianni Roghi became the Ferrari’s second owner. Several races followed with Roghi driving:

    June 2, 1963 XXV Coppa della Consuma hill climb 3rd in Class, 28th OA
    1963 Coppa Pisa 3rd in Class
    1963 Coppa Inter-Europa 6th in Class, 8th OA
    1963 Coppa Città d’ Asagio N/A

    No records exist of any further racing events for 2209 GT, but unfortunately in late 1966 or 1967 Roghi crashed the car. While the extent of the damage is not known, Roghi sold his beloved Ferrari to Tullio Lombardo on January 19th, 1967.

    On December 22nd, 1967, Lombardo sold 2209 GT to Gastone Crepaldi, and in 1968, he is believed to have commissioned Carrozzeria Piero Drogo in Modena to construct a new body following a design by Tadini. At the same time, the engine was replaced with a freshly rebuilt 250 GTE engine, 4921 GT.

    On May 29th, 1969 2209 GT, now wearing its smart new Drogo coachwork, was sold to Miss Maryvonne Lassus of St. Vite, France. She kept the car for just two years before selling it to Eric Russli Birchler of Paris on February 18th, 1971.

    Eventually, Birchler sold 2209 GT to Bernard Cros-La#%$e. At this point the story gets interesting, as the car was reported stolen in 1978. As it turns out, it seems most likely that Cros-La#%$e had some sort of dispute with a garage over repairs or storage, and the car was sold to settle the account. Later, after a thorough investigation by the French police and the UK Fine Arts squad, the ownership of the car was confirmed, and all subsequent owners have enjoyed clear title.

    In any event, the next owner was a M. Marty in Toulouse, who repainted the car metallic blue and registered it on French plates "6661VP 75". On July 9th, 1979, UK resident Stuart Passey became the ninth owner, via dealer Michael Lavers, registered on UK plates "SWB 70".

    At this point, Passey commissioned marque specialists DK Engineering to conduct a total restoration. This four-year project included new alloy panelwork by Grand Prix Metalcraft in the style of a SWB ’61. The car was refinished in its original Jo Schlesser Madagascar racing colors of white with a green stripe.

    Upon completion of the restoration, 2209 GT (at this point still with 250 GTE engine 4921 GT, stamped 2209 A) was shown extensively by Passey, including the 20th anniversary FOC meeting, at Oulton Park in 1987. Other outings included the Silverstone Historic Festival and the FF40 International Ferrari Concours in 1992, the Goodwood Festival of Speed and the FOC Concours at Cottesbrooke Hall in 1994, and the Tour de France Auto event in 1996.

    In January of 2003, 2209 GT was acquired by Frank Sytner, who resold the car in October of that year to the vendor, who repainted the car in yellow with green stripes. In 2004 and 2005, he campaigned the car successfully in the Shell Ferrari Historic Challenge series. After a shunt in Portugal while driven by a friend, the vendor elected to return the car to its original livery of white with green stripes.

    The vendor, a lifelong Ferrari enthusiast, then decided to embark on a program to return 2209 GT to its exact original configuration. After a great deal of negotiation with the owner of the car’s original engine, he was finally able to purchase it, subsequently having it rebuilt and reunited with its original competition components.

    At the same time, he arranged to ship the chassis and body to Ferrari’s new Classiche department in order to have the chassis inspected and the body returned to its exact original configuration. Upon completion of the work, 2209 GT returned to the UK to be reunited with its original engine for the first time in more than 35 years, earning its certification from Ferrari in the process.

    Today, 2209 GT is pristine, fresh from restoration and fully sorted. It has been built as the weapon of choice for an historic racer, but will be equally at home on the Mille Miglia – or the concours lawn at Ville d’ Este.

    Summary

    Painstaking historical research ensured that all details, including paint and trim were returned to exactly what they were when Jo Schlesser took delivery. The quality of the restoration, the originality of the components, and the authenticity of the details all combine to allow the successful bidder to be the first to enjoy 2209 GT exactly as it was when Jo Schlesser lined up for that first race at Montlhèry – as a four day old, brand new racing Ferrari.

    The 250 GT SWB has it all – power, style, and razor quick handling. Even the standard steel cars led full lives on the track. Only a handful of cars were factory built for special customers as all-out competition cars, with alloy bodies, special engines, and anything else the client wanted. Jo Schlesser was one of those rare people who could have anything he wanted – and 2209GT was his idea of the perfect Ferrari.

    It still is.
     
  9. Ferrari 512 ex-Luigi Chinetti/N.A.R.T.,

    The 512 S – Sports Car or Prototype?

    Ferrari’s 512 S represented yet another attempt by a manufacturer to take advantage of the homologation rules laid out by the C.S.I. (Commission Sportive International). It was a practice the C.S.I. was trying hard to avoid; manufacturers would build prototype racers, produce them in the required quantities and fit them with lights, horns, and spare tires - all the trappings of a road car. On paper, the 512 S was a car for the average Joe, but in reality, it was the fastest car Ferrari had ever built, capable of moving in excess of 235mph.

    With the new rules in place, Enzo Ferrari knew that it would be impossible for a ‘Sports Prototype’ of only three litres to compete against a five litre ‘Sports Car.’ In 1969, with the C.S.I.’s Group 6 rule change, a reduction from a minimum of 50 to 25 production units, and a major infusion of cash from Fiat, Ferrari quickly set about creating the 25 vehicles necessary to meet the Group 6 criteria.

    The 512 S was first introduced to the public at a press conference in November 1969. The chassis was similar to the one used on the P4 — a semi-monocoque design. The engine was a direct development of the 612 Can Am series unit, now fitted with twin overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder and Lucas fuel injection. Initially it could produce 550bhp at 8,500rpm. A year after initial production began, changes were made to improve reliability, lessen the weight and increase the overall horsepower — the engine could now produce 620bhp at 9,000rpm.

    All of the completed chassis were originally built in berlinetta configuration, but almost immediately, the 512 S began to undergo modification. The most noticeable change was the removal of the center section of the bodywork or roof panel – and on April 1, an addendum was accepted by the FIA and written into the homologation papers noting the availability of a spyder version.

    Chassis 1006 In Competition

    The 512’s competition debut took place when five identical 512 S berlinettas were lined up for the Daytona 24 Hour race on January 31, 1970. Mario Andretti succeeded in qualifying in first place, but the Porsche 917s were to stay in the lead throughout the whole of the actual race. Only one 512 was to survive twice around the clock – the official 512 S, driven alternately by Andretti, Arturo Merzario and Jacky Ickx, scoring a third place finish for Ferrari. For the 512’s first outing any type of podium finish against the mighty Porsche 917s was in itself a victory.

    Two weeks after Daytona, Ferrari delivered chassis 1006 to Luigi Chinetti for use by his North American Race Team. Chassis 1006 and three other 512s were entered in the 1970 12 Hours of Sebring. Three of these 512s, including chassis 1006, were now in ‘spyder’ configuration. This enabled their weight to be reduced by about 40kg and significantly improved headroom. One factory team car, driven by Nino Vaccarella and Ignazio Giunti, retained its berlinetta configuration.

    Chinetti had arranged for NART drivers Sam Posey and Ronnie Bucknum to race chassis 1006. In practice the two drove well, managing to qualify in 6th spot, ahead of the 512 S Ferrari works car of Giunti, Vaccarella and Andretti (the eventual overall winners). Posey and Bucknum were able to maintain their position for the early part of the race and by the fourth hour had moved into 5th place. Sadly, their race ended when the gearbox gave out early in the fifth hour. Despite this, the two managed to cover nearly 100 laps and were officially classified 42nd overall.

    Chinetti next arranged for Pedro Rodriguez and the now repaired chassis 1006 to contest several Can-Am races. The first of these occurred on August 23, 1970 when Rodriguez drove chassis 1006 at the Mid-Ohio Can-Am race, where he finished 11th overall, and then on August 30th he finished a very respectable 7th overall at Elkhart Lake.

    Chinetti now had two 512 S at his disposal. In late December 1970, Chinetti sent his lead driver, Sam Posey, along with chassis 1006 to Argentina for the upcoming 1000 km race at Buenos Aires. Three other 512s were also on hand, one of them in the improved new ‘M’ configuration. This included numerous improvements such as revised suspension and new front and rear body panels. Even with this new configuration it could only match the practice time of Posey in chassis 1006.

    Chassis 1006 was actually faster than the others were on the turns and flat out. Only in braking did the new 512 M show the benefits of the new modifications. All four 512s finished, one after another, occupying 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th. The new 512 M was clearly the slowest of the four 512s entered, but while chassis 1006 was slightly quicker, it still only managed to score a 8th overall, just behind the lone 512 M which finished 7th.

    After Buenos Aires, chassis 1006 was sent to the 24 Hours of Daytona along with chassis 1020. Four other 512s also competed in this classic endurance event. Three of the 512s were now in ‘M’ configuration. Clearly the fastest and best prepared was the 512 M of Roger Penske and Kirk White, chassis 1040.

    During the race, only chassis 1040 and the car on offer here, chassis 1006, presented any opposition to the Porsche 917s. For much of the race it appeared that chassis 1040 would take the checkered flag. An unfortunate accident late in the race forced 1040 back to third spot, while chassis 1006 soldiered on to an unforgettable and career highlight second overall.

    Most impressive though was the fact that 1006 gave the mighty 917 an impressive challenge for the first place victory, as the duel towards the end of the race had become the closest 1-2 finish in the history of the 24 Hours of Daytona.

    Seven weeks after 1006’s success at Daytona, Chinetti entered the car along with chassis 1020 in the 12 Hours of Sebring. 1006 was the sole 512 S amongst four ‘M’ variants. Once again, while chassis 1006 was extremely fast in practice, the race was relatively disappointing as the right rear tire let go sending 1006 limping back to the pits, the dry sump tank split, ending the car’s run. Officially Posey and Bucknum finished 37th overall.

    Chassis 1006’s final race of the 1971 season was the 24 Hours of Le Mans. No fewer than nine 512s were entered, but once again chassis 1006 was the sole example still in original ‘S’ configuration. In practice, the car proved to be the slowest of the Ferraris, but remained utterly reliable and as Le Mans was a test of endurance, Chinetti had strong hopes for a well-placed finish. Driving duties for the race were assigned to former Le Mans winner, Masten Gregory and the up-and-coming NART driver, George Eaton. The race again indicated that Porsche’s 917 was nearly unbeatable. Seven of the Ferrari 512s dropped out of the race with chassis 1006 forced to retire in the fifteenth hour with persistent fuel-injection problems caused by dirty fuel.

    Chassis 1006 – The Roster of Keepers

    Well cared for, despite being actively campaigned for both the 1970 and 1971 seasons, 1006 found a succession of loving and caring owners shortly after its competitive career ended

    Chassis 1006 was sold at the end of the 1971 season to enthusiast and vintage racer Harley Cluxton, who raced the car himself before passing it on to Californian Steve Earle (founder of the Monterey Historics), who later sold it to Chris Cord. It should be noted that a logbook from the Can Am series during this period still exists, although it does not accompany the car.

    In the mid 1970s, Cord sold the car to Hamilton M. Kelly of Pasadena, California, who eventually passed the car to well-known Ferrari connoisseur, collector, racer and enthusiast, Otis Chandler of Los Angeles, California. In 1977, Chandler sold chassis 1006 to Stoney Stollenwerck, who in turn sold the car two years later to Steven Griswold of Berkeley, California. Griswold almost immediately turned the car around to Michael Vernon in the United Kingdom. Vernon had been looking for a proper 512 for some years, and upon inspecting chassis 1006 agreed to purchase the car immediately.

    In the early 1990’s, chassis 1006 was acquired by the internationally known Rosso Bianco museum collection of Peter Kaus. Since then the Ferrari was sold to the United States where it has remained in private hands for five years, before being sold at RM’s Monterey Sports Car Auction to its current owner.

    The engine was rebuilt by Chris Dugan of Motion Products West and has virtually no track time on it remaining fresh for its next owner’s use. Prior to the engine rebuild chassis 1006 was intermittently raced, all the while performing competently and successfully on the track for its prior owner.

    The vendor reports that the 512 S is in excellent overall condition with a host of additional accessories including the parts necessary to convert the car to either the long or short tail configuration. Notably, we understand the 512 S is capable of being road registered. Eligible for both the Targa Florio and the Le Mans Classic, and accompanied by an invitation to join the Masters series for the Silverstone Classic, this 512 S offers its next owner a world of possibilities in both show and competitive use. A true beast of historic racing, it is one of the only cars of the period that offered a serious competitive threat to the Porsche 917.

    Summary

    Few 512s remain in existence, as many of these cars were driven beyond their useful life and were either crashed or written off. Chassis 1006 is one of the few 512s that has such a well-known race history and remains in largely original condition. It is one of the single most original and untouched 512s ever completed. In fact, while 25 examples were originally called for, just 22 were actually completed, and a mere 16 survive to this day. While all of the 512s were upgraded and modified to some extent, there remains a total of just four 512s, including this one, still in their ‘S’ configuration.

    Unfortunately for the unwary collector, many of the 512s that were destroyed and written off have now reappeared. Several have been rebuilt from the remains, or parts of the original remains, of cars destroyed while racing. Chassis 1006 is one of the few 512s that have managed to escape all controversy. Built for Luigi Chinetti’s North American Racing Team and driven by some of the best drivers of the period – Posey, Bucknum, Rodriguez, and Gregory – it is a singular piece of Ferrari racing history. In addition, with its second place finish at Daytona, Chassis 1006 has proven to have tremendous versatility with commendable performances in three unique arenas – endurance events, road races, and even Can-Am - one of the best racing histories of any of Ferrari’s 512s.

    This particular 512 represents an uncommon opportunity to acquire one of the few and certainly one of the finest examples left. Chassis 1006 is possibly the single best known and certainly one of the most cared for Ferrari 512s left in existence. In short, it is a legendary car from a legendary era in motor racing.
     
  10. Without any exception these are cars which have been on offer before, but didn't sell; from what I heard there's something fishy about that 250 SWB as well, it was for sale in Gstaad a few years ago, as was the 310B (in practice old Ferrari F1 cars hardly ever sell...)
     
  11. This people just collect them, how can I have a 288GTO with only 1300km on it? this guys really don't like to drive them ...
     
  12. I will take the 512
     
  13. he was a very old man and he couldn't really drive standard cars anymore. I put 2 of those kilometers on that car. its never been abused.
     
  14. I hate you right now.
     
  15. Ferrari 365 GTB/4 'Daytona' GTS Spyder From the Edsel Ford Collection, with just two owners from new

    colour Giallo Fly
    interior colour Black
    drive LHD
    type Cabrio / Roadster
    year 1971
    Chassis No. 14671
    Price estimate: 391.000 - 493.000 GBP
    VAT No

    An exclusive auction at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, where the legend was born, dedicated exclusively to the most superb road going and racing Ferraris, as well as many virtually irreplaceable lots of Ferrari memorabilia.

    Many enthusiasts consider the Ferrari 365 GTB/4 to be the definitive front-engined sportscar, the ultimate example of the traditional grand tourer, and it is undoubtedly a classic design. The open Spyder configuration is a favourite among the world’s Ferraristi, and often mentioned as one of the cars most would like to own. The combination of Ferrari’s superb engineering and Pininfarina’s design is hard to beat because this is a fabulous Ferrari, whether stationary or on the move. There are cars that look great but drive badly, and others that drive well but are not beautiful, but in the ownership of a Daytona can be had the best of both worlds.

    Alongside the 365 GTB/4 Berlinetta, Ferrari also produced a small series of 365 GTB/4 Spyders. These are among the most-sought-after open Ferraris and have always been held in high regard. It was a worthy successor to the previous 275 GTB/4 and was quickly nicknamed ‘Daytona’ in recognition of Ferrari’s one-two-three win at the 24-hour race the previous year.

    The first “Daytona Spyder” was presented at the 44th Annual IAA Motor Show in Frankfurt on 11 September 1969. The example shown was finished in yellow with the concave bodyline finished in black, and featured Borrani wire wheels. The rear wings were squared-off on the top edges, losing some of the roundness of the Berlinetta and subtly altering the accent of the bodyline. The first 365 GTB/4 Spyder was fitted with the Perspex covered headlights, although all further Daytona Spyders were fitted with the pop-up headlights.

    In all, Ferrari produced just 121 Daytona Spyders plus the prototype. 96 units were destined for the U.S. market and only 25 were built to European specifications (seven of which were right hand drive). Clearly, the bulk of production was destined for Ferrari’s most important export market, the USA.

    This car is one of these desirable U.S. versions. It is the 26th Daytona Spyder built by Carrozzeria Scaglietti in Modena and was originally ordered in yellow (Giallo Fly 20-Y-191) with a black interior. According to the factory files 22 of the 121 cars built, plus the prototype, were originally painted in the traditional Giallo Fly. Serial number 14671 has Scaglietti body number 636 and was equipped with the desirable feature of air conditioning. As a U.S. delivery car, the speedometer is calibrated in miles.

    Chassis number 14671 was completed in October 1971. The original destination was Luigi Chinetti Motors in Greenwich, Connecticut, USA. After certificate of origin number 8747 was issued, the brand new yellow 365 GTB/4 Spyder was shipped on 18 December 1971 aboard the vessel “SS Savonita” from Italy to New York, where it arrived on Thursday the 27th January 1972. It was again a Thursday, when on 2nd March 1972 Chinetti Motors invoiced the Spyder to Roger Penske’s Chevrolet dealership in Southfield, Michigan.

    Penske then actually leased it from 1972 to 1976 to first owner J. Anthony Forstman, a businessman in New York City. In October 1978 this Daytona Spyder was back at Chinetti Motors who advertised it for sale in the Los Angeles Times, and it is believed to be at this time that it entered the long-term ownership of Mr. Edsel Ford II of Dearborn, MI.,

    On the 3rd of August 2002 Mr. Ford showed this beautiful Daytona Spyder during the prestigious Concours Italian Style at Grosse Point Shores, Michigan. Never neglected or abused this highly original car has been kept garaged at the owner’s private residence and has been very well maintained for its entire life. Chassis 14671 is offered here for the first time on the open market.

    For many years Daytona Spyders have been the world’s fastest convertibles. Today they remain most enthusiasts’ dream ride – whether along the Pacific Coast Highway or touring the French
     
  16. Ferrari 'Dino' Sports Proto 206 SP ex-SEFAC Ferrari, Pedro Rodriguez and Richie Ginther, North American Racing Team, Charlie Kolb, George Follmer, Jo Schlesser, Masten Gregory and Peter Gregg

    colour Red/White/Blue
    interior colour Racing
    drive RHD
    type Cabrio / Roadster
    year 1966
    Chassis No. 008
    Engine No. 008
    Price estimate: 1.122.000 - 1.326.000 GBP
    VAT No

    An exclusive auction at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, where the legend was born, dedicated exclusively to the most superb road going and racing Ferraris, as well as many virtually irreplaceable lots of Ferrari memorabilia.

    Lightweight. Aerodynamic. Powerful. The Ferrari 206 SP is the lithe, sinuous, brilliant V-6 son to the V-12 father. It is similar in many respects, but accomplished with conscious differences.

    The Origins of the Dino Legend

    When Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien went to Le Mans in 1962 and were assigned the 330 TRI/LM, the last front-engined car to win at la Sarthe, they felt a little cheated. There were better Ferraris in Ferrari’s entry. There were V-8 and V-6 Dinos. Hill and Gendebien knew the mid-engined Dinos were Ferrari’s future. They drove a dinosaur, and their victory was a tribute to their skill and maturity as drivers as much as it was to the durability, stability, reliability and speed of the four-litre 330 TRI/LM, the ultimate Testa Rossa.

    The V-6 Dinos were introduced in 1957 for the 1.5-litre Formula 2 series. Enzo Ferrari’s son Alfredo – known as “Dino” - had championed the engines’ layout, and Enzo gave the cars Dino’s name after his son’s untimely death in 1956. The detailed design was done by the old master, Vittorio Jano. With twin overhead camshafts, the inherently balanced conventional cylinder bank angle of 60° left no room for carburetors and inlet manifolding, so Jano increased the included angle to 65°, then compensated for the timing problem with crank throws placed 65° and 185° apart. It was ingenious, and it worked. The first Dino sports racing cars were front-engined; mid-engined cars appeared in 1962, the models Hill and Gendebien hoped to drive at Le Mans. Ferrari then dealt with the problems of slipping a V-12 between the driver and the rear wheels, and development of the compact V-6 powered Dinos languished.

    The Sports Prototypes

    Ferrari was challenged by Ford in the mid 60s and responded with a series of Sports Prototypes that have earned their position as the most seductively beautiful sports racing cars ever built. The first 330 P was introduced in 1964 and its design clearly showed its evolution from the 250 LM. The 1965 season’s 330 P2, however, was something completely different and it evolved into the Drogo-built 330 P3 the following year, surely the most voluptuous sports racing automobiles ever seen.

    At the same time Ferrari introduced the 206 S, an even more tightly wrapped, reduced scale rendition of the 330 P3 with the same voluptuous, sensuous shape on a shorter wheelbase that took full advantage of its compact V-6 powerplant. Franco Rocchi designed this third generation twin-cam V-6, returning to Jano’s original 65° vee angle. It would power not only the 206 S but also the street cars needed to meet the FIA’s requirement that Formula 2 engines be based upon a production engine with at least 500 units built – which Ferrari met in cooperation with Fiat in the Dino sports cars. In addition to the Ferrari sports prototypes and Formula 2 cars, the engine would later power the Ferrari Dino road cars and even the Lancia Stratos rally car.

    Like the 330 P3, the Dino 206 S was bodied by Drogo’s Carrozzeria Sports Cars. It used a multi-tube frame with alloy panels riveted to it for additional stiffness, in essence a semi-monocoque structure. Ferrari’s intention was that 50 of the cars would be built, qualifying it as an FIA Group 4 sports car, but the financial difficulties that would lead to Ferrari’s merger with Fiat three years later prevented that optimistic goal from being met and in the end only some 18 of these wonderful, quick, beautiful sports racers were built. What started out as a Dino 206 S (for Sport) became known as the Dino 206 SP (for Sports Prototype) when there were not enough built to qualify for Group 4.

    Chassis No. 008

    The meticulously and accurately restored example offered here, chassis 008, is the fourth of the series production 206 SPs built, (The first 206 S was built on Ferrari chassis 0842) and the third of the standard alloy spider bodied 206 SPs. It was delivered to the SEFAC Ferrari team and used for testing and evaluation. Some sources indicate it was entered by the factory to be run by Luigi Chinetti’s North American Racing Team in the 1000 km race at Monza April 25, 1966 where it was driven by NART driver Bob Bondurant and SEFAC driver Nino Vaccarella, but was damaged in practice and withdrawn before starting the race.

    Six weeks later on June 5, Dino 206 SP 008 was again entered for NART in the ADAC 1000 km of the Nürburgring, one of the season’s most demanding races. Driven by the brilliant pairing of Pedro Rogriguez and Richie Ginther, both SEFAC team drivers in 1966, the 206 SP started ninth on the grid and drove to an outstanding third overall and second in class behind another 206 SP, the fuel injected chassis 004 driven by Scarfiotti and Bandini, and the winning Chaparral 2D of Phil Hill and Jo Bonnier which thundered to the overall victory. Remarkably, all three podium finishers were on the same lap of the daunting 22.81 km Nürburgring Nordschleife.

    On June 18, 1966 still fresh from its podium finish at the Nürburgring, chassis 008, using a SEFAC Ferrari entry, was on hand at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The car was however now owned by Chinetti, having been sold by SEFAC Ferrari on June 10. Chinetti put Charlie Kolb and George Follmer in the 206 SP and they started in 32nd position. After an excellent start, oil seeped onto the clutch rendering it useless and on just the 9th lap the team withdrew, a fate eventually shared by 40 of the 55 entrants - 73 percent of the starting grid.

    Kolb’s seat at Le Mans foreshadowed the next stage in 008’s career. After returning to Maranello for servicing and race prep it was shipped to the U.S. and its next owner, M. Schroeder, who immediately entered it in the August 28 USRRC-Buckeye Cup race in Lexington, Ohio where it was driven by Charlie Kolb. Kolb brought the 206 SP home second in class and sixth overall.

    Entries at The Road America 500 at Elkhart Lake and the USRRC race at Bridgehampton followed before 008 was purchased by Fred Baker, who arranged to use a Chinetti entry in the 1967 Daytona 24 Hours. A fresh engine rebuild and gearbox overhaul were not completed in time to qualify, and 008 started from the back of the grid as a result. The driving team was strong – Jo Schlesser, Masten Gregory and Peter Gregg. At just over half distance, after moving within sight of a top 10 placing, Gregory made a routine pit stop only to have the engine develop a misfire when it restarted, which turned out to be a stripped distributor drive.

    Baker again used a Chinetti entry for his Dino 206 SP at the Sebring 12 Hours on April 1. Charlie Kolb and Ed Crawford started from 20th on the grid, where they remained when the green flag fell, sidelined by a broken half shaft. For the remainder of 1967 the 206 SP contested SCCA and USRRC races driven by Lee Cutler and occasionally Charlie Kolb.

    It was back at Daytona for the 24 hours in 1968 after being rebuilt by Chinetti’s NART mechanics. Now consigned or loaned to Chinetti, he put Kolb and Pedro Rodriguez in Dino 206 SP 008 and Rodriguez qualified an excellent 10th among the three litre Alfa Romeo Tipo 33/2s. Kolb and Rodriguez kept the little Dino among the top 10 until another misfire brought them into the pits and early retirement. Baker decided to sell the car, although Lee Cutler apparently worked out a deal to drive it in later races. Before the end of the year he bought the Dino from Baker, marking the end of its front line racing career.

    Harley Cluxton bought it from Cutler in 1971, selling it later that year to noted Ferrari collector and enthusiast, Walter Medlin in Kissimmee, Florida. Medlin did nothing with the beautiful little 206 SP except store it among his other cars where it stayed for more than 20 years. In 1995 it was acquired by Symbolic Motor Car Company and given a complete two-year restoration by Rob Shanahan. After completion, it became part of several important Ferrari collections and was proudly displayed at such diverse and important events as Rosso Ferrari at Rodeo Drive and the Goodwood Festival of Speed (both in 1997) and Cavallino Classic in 2004. It was featured in the Japanese magazine CAR in 1998. In 2003 it was returned to Symbolic’s restoration shop where it received a comprehensive refurbishment.

    It was acquired by the present owner after completion of the work and was displayed at Cavallino Classic in 2004. The vendor reports the Dino is on the button and is in excellent overall mechanical condition. It is a personal favorite of his and while he has not competitively raced it regularly, he is drawn to its character and uniqueness just as Medlin was so many years ago. Most recently the 206 SP has been returned to its glorious NART livery as it appeared at the 1000 Kms of Nürburgring when it had finished 2nd in class behind another Dino and 3rd overall.

    1966 Ferrari Dino 206 SP 008 retains its original engine, gearbox and bodywork. Its restoration is of the highest quality and is fresh and sharp. Its history includes ownership and entries by both SEFAC Ferrari and NART. It has been driven by some of the greats in the greatest age of sports car and sports prototype racing: Bondurant, Vaccarella, Pedro Rodriguez, Ginther, Kolb, Follmer, Schlesser, Gregory and even Peter Gregg. Its ownership history is clear. It is fast, responsive and, best of all, a beautiful gem of a car.
     
  17. Ferrari 250 GT SWB

    colour Red
    interior colour Tan
    drive LHD
    type Coupe
    year 1962
    Chassis No. 3401 GT
    Engine No. 3401 GT
    Price estimate: 1.156.000 - 1.360.000 GBP
    VAT No

    An exclusive auction at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, where the legend was born, dedicated exclusively to the most superb road going and racing Ferraris, as well as many virtually irreplaceable lots of Ferrari memorabilia.

    Once Enzo Ferrari realized that the marque’s wealthy racing followers would purchase all the Grand Touring road cars that he could produce, this became the preferred method of financing his beloved racing team. In the past, sales of used racing cars and commercial sponsorships had generated funds, but neither consistently nor in sufficient quantity.

    In the first seven years – the 1947 to 1954 period - only about 200 road cars left the factory while sales for the first “Series-Produced” GTs, the Boano and Ellena 250 GT models totaled some 150 units in their two and a half years of manufacture. After that, production expanded rapidly. The mechanical specifications of the GT Ferraris in this glorious era were always based on the company’s current racing cars, a fact which was not lost on sporting motorists who coveted these thoroughbreds – even at the US$10,000 plus port-of-entry price into Ferrari’s most important export market.

    This concept also made GT Ferraris an excellent customer racing car because of their dual-purpose personality. Seeing a niche market opportunity the factory built some 94 long wheelbase berlinettas – “The Tour de France” model was based on the Boano/Ellena chassis but with lightweight alloy bodies and slightly improved engine output. “Gentlemen drivers” loved them and virtually dominated European GT racing in the famed TdFs from 1957 to 1959; however, the TdF was only a precursor to the mighty Ferrari that was to follow – the ultimate and even more competitive dual purpose machine – the 250 GT Short Wheelbase Berlinetta.

    Introduced in 1959, the 250 GT Berlinetta was designed with three objectives: first, to be more aerodynamically efficient; second, to be as compact as possible; and third, to provide appropriate accommodations and luggage space for a true grand turismo automobile. In the process, Pininfarina and Scaglietti created one of the most beautiful automobiles of all time, a succinct, straightforward and purposeful blending of form following function that is pleasing from all aspects.

    Seven cars, known today as “Interim Berlinettas”, were built on the 2600mm long wheelbase chassis before construction was shifted to the 2400mm short wheelbase chassis, a change deemed desirable to improve the cars’ responsiveness in cornering. Still called the 250 GT Berlinetta by Ferrari, its wheelbase has subsequently been firmly attached to the factory’s model designation to distinguish it from numerous other 250 GT models and the 2600mm chassis “Interim Berlinettas.”

    As the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta it has established a reputation and following, second only to its successor, the illustrious 250 GTO. Pininfarina’s body design as executed by Scaglietti on the 2400mm short wheelbase chassis excels in all aspects. It is unmistakably Ferrari, executed in a very restrained way. Its purity of shape is not compromised by unnecessary trim or faux scoops. The driver’s visibility from the ample greenhouse is also excellent while the corners of the car are tightly wrapped around the wheels and its gently rounded masses speak unambiguously of potency and power.

    The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta was immediately successful in racing and remained so until its place at the head of the GT pack was gradually assumed by the GTO. The list of competition successes is so long as to be pointless to recount in detail but included GT category wins at LeMans in 1960 and 1961, Tour de France wins in 1960, 1961 and 1962 and of course Stirling Moss’s pair of Goodwood Tourist Trophy wins in 1960 and 1961. The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta is the last true dual purpose grand turismo built in quantity by Ferrari – or anyone else for that matter – and is in all respects a fitting milestone to mark the end of a legendary age.

    Chassis No. 3401 GT

    The 135th of 165 250 GT SWB Berlinettas built, s/n 3401 GT was sold new on April 21st, 1962 to an Italian gentleman, Sig. Molgara, and registered on Milan plates bearing the number “MI 651485”. One of just 36 examples completed in 1962, its original colors were green with a black “lusso” interior.

    Molgara kept the Ferrari for eight years before selling it to Hans Wiemuller of Munich, Germany. Two years later, in 1972, he sold the car to its next long term owner, another German named Georg Amtmann.

    Amtmann had the car fully restored, and changed the color to Rosso Corsa. He enjoyed the car for the next 13 years before s/n 3401 GT went to its fourth owner, Swiss collector Erich Traber via dealer Albrecht Guggisberg’s Oldtimer Garage in 1985. The restoration was updated in 1987 by Sportgarage Graber in Wichtrach, Switzerland.

    Later in 1987, s/n 3401 GT was purchased by Swiss resident Italian car dealer Eugenio Amoruso in Solothurn, Switzerland. He used it in a variety of events for the next two years

    In November of 1992, s/n 3401 GT was purchased by dealer Edgar Herbert Engel of Haltern, Germany, who sold it a few months later to Dirk Rainer Ebeling of Wiesbaden. Ebeling had the car completely restored again, and kept it for about three years before selling it to Franco Meiners of Bremen in August of 1996.

    In 1997, Meiners decided to use the car in vintage racing. He had the original engine (No. 3401) removed from the car and set aside while a race-prepared engine from a 250 GTE was installed; it is believed that the external fuel filler was added at this point. A fuel cell was also installed, and the car was inspected and homologated by GIPI Cars in Opera-Milan, Italy, following which FIA Homologation Certificate #1538 was issued for the car.

    For three years Mieners and his partner Bernard Duc raced s/n 3401 GT at various historic events, eventually deciding to offer the car for sale through dealer Axel Schuette. The original engine was reinstalled, and the car was offered on and off by Schuette until July of 2002, when it joined the renowned collection of Bruce McCaw of Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.

    In August of 2005, Seattle-based developer Ken McBride acquired s/n 3401 GT in a trade deal with Bruce McCaw shortly before selling it to the vendor.

    Today, after several owners and at least three restorations, s/n 3401 GT is in wonderful condition. Ferrari’s Classiche department has recently completed a full service, and the car is believed to be in very good operating condition as well. All its major components – including body, chassis, engine, gearbox and rear axle, remain original to the car.

    The Ferrari 250 GT SWB is eligible for every important motoring event on the planet, will never be denied entry into any Ferrari club event and will out perform nearly everything in its class with ease at the hands of a skilled driver. Sensational looks coupled with unsurpassed driving dynamics and well-proven investment potential makes s/n 3401 GT one of those rare opportunities to acquire a car that is a pleasure to invest in – as well as an investment in pleasure.
     
  18. Ferrari 340 MM Ex- Giuseppe Farina 1953 Mille Miglia Factory Entry, and Sole Surviving

    colour Red
    interior colour Tan
    drive RHD
    type Cabrio / Roadster
    year 1953
    Chassis No. 0268 AM
    Engine No. 0268 AM
    Price estimate: 1.292.000 - 1.632.000 GBP
    VAT No

    An exclusive auction at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, where the legend was born, dedicated exclusively to the most superb road going and racing Ferraris, as well as many virtually irreplaceable lots of Ferrari memorabilia.

    The Lampredi Engine

    Aurelio Lampredi had joined Ferrari in 1947, effectively succeeding Gioacchino Colombo at the head of Ferrari’s design team in 1949. A consummate engine designer, Lampredi’s first assignment was to design a large displacement version of Colombo’s original Ferrari V-12 with the intent of meeting the needs of the 4.5-litre naturally aspirated formula then in effect for Grands Prix. For some reason, the initial version of the engine was much smaller, at just 3.3 litres.

    His engine was a work of art. It respected Colombo’s pioneering work on Ferrari’s first SOHC V-12, while incorporating a host of improvements – one of the most important of which was his use of screw-in cylinder liners to prevent the head gasket failures that had been experienced by high compression and supercharged Colombo engines.

    The 4.5-litre 375s appeared late in the 1950 GP season and were the team cars for 1951. When the FIA adopted Formula 2 for the 1952 World Championship the Lampredi long block engine quickly faded from Grand Prix racing, but equally quickly found its home in Ferrari’s legendary sports cars.

    The 340 Ferraris

    The first of these Lampredi-engined Ferraris were 3.3-litre sports cars built in 1950. Two of these 275 S models entered the 1950 Mille Miglia driven by Alberto Ascari and Luigi Villoresi but dropped out with driveline failures. It was a classic problem – the new engine’s outstanding power and torque simply overwhelmed the existing gearbox and axle.

    Rather than reduce the output of the engine, Ferrari raised it by increasing displacement to 4.1 litres, mating it to a new chassis and driveline designed for the horsepower and torque of the Lampredi engines. The new models were called 340s, and they would become one of Ferrari’s most successful and famous early models.

    Series production consisted of a total of 37 cars with a chassis number range from 0082A to 0350 AM. 23 were 340 Americas with distributor ignition 220bhp engines, and four were 280bhp 340 Mexicos, also with distributor ignition.

    The ultimate evolution of the model, and the most powerful road car built by Ferrari to that point, was the magneto-equipped 300bhp 340 Mille Miglia – of which just ten were built. They established an outstanding competition record both for the factory and their many private owners, including Giannino Marzotto’s 1953 Mille Miglia victory. Of the ten 340 MMs built, five were spyders bodied by Vignale, three were berlinettas by Pinin Farina, and finally, two carried spyder coachwork by Touring.

    As a factory team car the Ferrari 340 MM had a brilliant yet relatively short career. The cars were successful from the start, winning the Tour of Sicily with Luigi Villoresi and the Mille Miglia with Count Giannino Marzotto in April 1953 plus the Daily Express Trophy race at Silverstone in May. The 340 MMs were then sold to private clients and entered in a number of races, scoring many successes, particularly in America where the large displacement cars were in strong demand.

    Carrozzeria Touring – Masters of Lightweight Beauty

    One of the best known names in Italian coachbuilding, Carrozzeria Touring was founded by Felice Bianchi Anderloni in 1926 in Milan. Their proximity to both Alfa-Romeo and Isotta-Fraschini lead to commissions from both legendary marques, and they created some of the most startlingly beautiful cars of all time – including the Isotta-Fraschini Flying Star and the legendary Alfa Romeo 8C-2900 Touring Spyder.

    Touring’s talents led to production aircraft work, which allowed them to learn about lightweight construction – which in turn led directly to the firm’s patented Superleggera – or ultra light weight - system for constructing automobile bodies. It was both simple and elegant, utilizing a network of lightweight alloy tubing to support equally light alloy panelwork.

    Anderloni died just after the war, which left the company in the very capable hands of his son, Carlo. Touring quickly became the favored coachbuilder for Ferrari, no doubt at least partly as a result of Enzo Ferrari’s familiarity with their work during his prewar days racing Touring-bodied Alfa Romeos for his beloved Scuderia Ferrari.

    Carlo proved as talented in design as his father was, and his association with Ferrari produced some of the greatest automobiles of all time – including the iconic Touring Barchetta.

    A Singular Example - 0268 AM

    The design of 0268 AM – a superlative example of Touring’s “Superleggera” construction - is quite graceful, with long flowing lines and an aggressive stance that combine to lend a lean, purposeful look to the car. A low Perspex windscreen and external fuel filler attest to the car’s competition bloodlines. All the 340 MMs were top shelf racing cars, although sadly, few have survived in their original configuration.

    0268 AM is the first of these legendary cars, and the only surviving example of Carrozzeria Touring’s exceptionally handsome competition spyder coachwork on the 340 MM chassis. It, along with its sister car, 0294 AM, debuted as factory cars for Scuderia Ferrari at the 1953 Mille Miglia in Brescia. No fewer than twenty-seven Ferraris contested this 20th edition of the grueling race from Brescia to Rome and back to Brescia. Nineteen started in the over two-litre sports car class, and another eight cars in the under two-litre class.

    The factory raced four 4.1-litre engined 340 MMs: two Vignale Spyders for Giannino Marzotto and Tom Cole, and the two Touring Spyders for Giuseppe Farina and Luigi Villoresi. Support came from various 250 Mille Miglias and numerous other Ferraris. S/N 0268 AM was given race number 615, indicating the starting time at Brescia at 6.15 AM. It was driven by Farina who partnered with Luigi Parenti, but the race was a short one, ending as a dnf with a broken rear axle.

    The damage was quickly repaired, and 0268 AM was sold to Frenchman Pierre Boncompagni, who raced under the alias of Pagnibon. He raced it on 24 May 1953 at the 3-hour race of Algiers, which he won. One week later, on May 31, 1953, he won the Coupes de Paris at Montlhéry, France. For this race a French blue nose band was added. The following weekend, on the 7th of June 1953, Boncompagni raced it at the Hyères 12 hour race in the South of France. The Frenchman lost control and crashed. Tragically, Boncompagni was killed. 0268 AM was returned to Italy where the damage – primarily to the front end – was fully repaired.

    When the work was completed, 0268 AM was sold to Luigi Chinetti in the U.S. In 1959 it was raced several times in California, including by Jack and Gary Brumby in Vacaville, by Bill Krause at Santa Barbara, and finally by Stuart Aldhouse at Del Mar. In the 1960s the car passed through the hands of several owners – one of whom was president of the Ferrari Owners Club at the time, who used it for street racing in Southern California. In the 1970s it spent several years on display in the famous Briggs Cunningham Museum in Costa Mesa, California.

    In the meantime, the sister car, 0294 AM, was badly crashed and subsequently rebodied by Carrozzeria Scaglietti in Modena in the style of a 750 Monza, leaving 0268 AM as the only 340 MM Touring Spyder surviving in its original configuration.

    By the early 1990s, the car had joined the collection of Swiss enthusiast Erich Traber, who used the car in several events, including the 1994 Monterey Historics. In 1995 the vendor acquired the car and continued to campaign it, including stints at both the Colorado Grand and the Mille Miglia – which was documented in an article in Forza magazine. The vendor reports that several items accompany the car, including an original oil painting and a framed original poster from the 1953 Mille Miglia.

    For many years now, 0268 AM has been carefully maintained by renowned Ferrari specialist Patrick Ottis of Berkeley, California.

    Summary

    These wonderful Lampredi-engined cars are highly sought after by collectors today as they retain much of the delightful balance and handling of the Colombo powered cars, but with the addition of seemingly endless power and a unique, intoxicating and unmistakable song under full throttle. They are, today, in many ways the quintessential event car.

    With its award-winning restoration, authentic period livery, Lampredi “long block” power, charismatic – and original - Touring coachwork and outstanding competition history, 0268 AM is a remarkable example of the Ferrari 340 MM, one of Ferrari’s most exceptional and highly prized models. Perhaps most importantly, this exceptionally important Ferrari is not only the first but also the sole survivor of its kind – and one of the most original 340 MMs remaining today.
     
  19. Ferrari 330 TRI/LM The 1962 Le Mans-winning, Phil Hill/Olivier Gendebien

    An exclusive auction at the Ferrari Factory in Maranello, where the legend was born, dedicated exclusively to the most superb road going and racing Ferraris, as well as many virtually irreplaceable lots of Ferrari memorabilia.

    The first car in a series is good. But the last car is best. It is inevitably refined, improved and developed. Its weaknesses have been addressed and its strengths have been enhanced.

    Technical sophistication is important, particularly if it represents a unique and successful configuration. A real, documented and important history makes it better, more so if it includes a roster of the best drivers. But most important of all is success. Commercial success is good, but success in competition is better and the overall winner of the 24 Heures du Mans is the best of all. The expression of all these attributes is the 1962 Ferrari 330 TRI/LM, chassis number 0808, offered here. The only 4-litre Testa Rossa built, it also is the last Testa Rossa and the last front-engined sports racing car built by Ferrari. Driven by the incomparable endurance racing pairing of Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien, it is the last front-engined car to capture the overall victory at Le Mans, and the Hill/Gendebien team’s epic third Le Mans win. It is, in so many important and meaningful ways, unique. The Ferrari Testa Rossa is the most famous series of sports-racing cars ever built. This is the ultimate Ferrari Testa Rossa. Its provenance is impeccably documented. It is incomparably and absolutely unique. Frequently driven by its current owner, it is “on the button” and ready to demonstrate its prowess on the track or in the most demanding, satisfying and exciting open road events.

    The Testa Rossa and Le Mans

    The Testa Rossa was already a racing success when it was introduced in late 1957 and it went on to a string of victories that are simply too numerous to describe in anything less than a book, and indeed, several have been written. But it was at Le Mans where the Testa Rossa established its reputation.

    Starting at 4 p.m., Le Mans races through the shortest weekend night of the year, at a latitude where the Midnight Sun is not an abstraction. It frequently drenches its competitors with rain. Sunrise comes early, only to remind competitors that the race is barely half over. Scion of the original French Grand Prix, it is the last great road race on closed public roads. Scuderia Ferrari built its best Testa Rossas for Le Mans, winning in 1958 (Hill/Gendebien, s/n 0728), 1960 (Frere/Gendebien, TR 59/60 s/n 0772/0774), 1961 (Hill/Gendebien, TRI61 s/n 0794) and 1962 (Hill/Gendebien with 330 TRI/LM s/n 0808).

    The Scuderia Ferrari Testa Rossas evolved in four distinct generations after the two 290 MM- and 500 TRC-based prototypes. The while the prototype, S/N 0666 had a deDion rear suspension, the other 1958 cars had live rear axles, left-hand drive and were bodied by Scaglietti with pontoon fenders. They were followed by a series of TR59s, now with envelope bodies designed by Pininfarina and constructed by Fantuzzi. The TRI60 followed, with similar bodies but now with independent rear suspension, indicated by the “I” (“Independente”) in their designation. They were superseded by the TRI61s, again bodied by Fantuzzi but now with the twin nostril nose carried over from the Scuderia’s GP cars and taller, squared-off tails with the ducktail spoiler which Ferrari’s empirical testing had found successfully improved performance and stability. The fifth and ultimate iteration of the Scuderia Ferrari Testa Rossas was not a “generation” at all, it being the unique 330 TRI/LM offered here.

    330 TRI/LM s/n 0808

    The CSI and A.C.O. restructured rules and classifications for 1962, placing their emphasis upon GT cars and eliminating the 3-litre sports-racing class which the Testa Rossas had dominated. However, the displacement limit for GTs was increased to 4 litres and a new Experimental category was added with a 4-litre displacement limit. Ferrari’s current sports-racers were by now mid-engined and V6 or V8 powered but Ferrari decided to create the ultimate Testa Rossa for the Experimental category, the 330 TRI/LM. It had been thought for years that Ferrari based the chassis of the 330 TRI/LM on the modified frame of 250 TRI60/61 s/n 0780, however records recently discovered at Ferrari make it clear this was not the case.

    Invoicing from Ferrari's frame supplier, Vaccari, reflecting the construction of a new frame specifically for the 4-litre 330 TRI/LM project show that 0808 was built on its own chassis, the same one still fitted, designed specifically to take advantage of the opportunity presented by the new rules – and to win LeMans. Not only built as the last Testa Rossa but also the last front-engined Ferrari sports racer of any kind, Ferrari's concept for the 4-litre 330 TRI/LM and determination that it would be a serious challenger for the Experimental category and overall wins is clearly demonstrated by the decision to make the 330 TRI/LM a completely new, purpose-built car to carry the 4-litre engine.

    The 4-litre Lampredi V-12 was some 4” longer than the 3-litre Colombo engines for which the Testa Rossa chassis was designed, so the new frame was made longer than the standard 3-litre Testa Rossa - but by only 2¾” to retain the car’s balance. At the same time it was made extra strong to handle the additional power and torque of the bigger engine. The standard TRI61 5-speed gearbox was also augmented with stronger gears; the suspension was the all-independent, coil spring design which had proven its robust road holding in the TRI 60 and 61. Given the chassis number 0808, Ferrari installed an extensively modified Tipo 163 Superamerica V-12 that closely pressed the 4-litre maximum with 3,967cc. With special Testa Rossa-style free-breathing cylinder heads, big valves and six 2-barrel Weber 42 DCN carbs, the big V-12 was tuned to give 390 horsepower for the race, at least 50 more horsepower than the best of the earlier Scuderia Ferrari Testa Rossas had ever had.

    In the 330 TRI/LM Ferrari distilled all its experience with four years of building and racing Testa Rossas into its ultimate expression, built with one objective: to win the 24 Heures du Mans.

    Fantuzzi created the longer body which Phil Hill described in his October 1982 Salon feature on this car in Road & Track magazine as, “… a combination of the old Testa Rossa shape, but with the double nostril nose and the cutoff tail-with-a-spoiler that were used on the mid-engine cars. Behind the cockpit was an airfoil; while ahead of us was a full wraparound windscreen that blended into side windows…. With the perspective of years its shape seems almost perfect.”

    Continuing from Phil Hill’s Road & Track Salon article, “… Testa Rossas were the reason Ferrari was able to dominate sports car racing in much of the world, and produce some of the most beautiful sports racing cars of the postwar era. In 1962 … the TR lineage was about to end and the 330 [TRI/LM] became the last Testa Rossa. Seen from that view, the big car’s lines look even better, flowing yet tough, the graceful shape only interrupted when necessary by an air scoop, a bonnet handle or a leather strap … the rounded looks-good-to-the-eye shape of the Fifties ending at the scientific cutoff Kamm tail of the Sixties.”

    Arriving late at the Le Mans Test Day, April 9-10, the 330 TRI/LM was tested only on the second day’s session. Hampered by rain, Willy Mairesse nevertheless turned in the day’s fastest lap at 4 minutes 10.8 seconds, a remarkable accomplishment for a high powered sports-racer on a rain-slicked track and one that hinted at the 330 TRI/LM’s success to come.

    Further development followed in Maranello and the 330 TRI/LM was not entered in either of the intervening World Challenge races, the Targa Florio and Nürburgring 1000km. It arrived at Le Mans along with the other Scuderia Ferrari entries: 330 GTO/LM, Dino 268 SP and Dino 246 SP. They were assigned respectively to Michael Parkes/Lorenzo Bandini, Giancarlo Baghetti/Ludovico Scarfiotti and the Rodriguez brothers. The 330 TRI/LM was assigned to the proven masters of long distance racing and the Ferrari Testa Rossa, Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien.

    At Le Mans 1962 the 330 TRI/LM’s competition came from the other Scuderia Ferrari entries, a trio of 4-litre Maserati Tipo 151 coupés and several Aston Martins, but in effect there was no competition. In practice the 330 TRI/LM was a full 3½ seconds faster than anything else, that being the 330 GTO/LM. The 330 TRI/LM’s success was expressed by Phil Hill in the Road & Track salon article: “Although the 330 was something of a brute in concept, it was not a brutish car to drive. It was also a damn fast car and with it I was able to break Mike Hawthorn’s Le Mans lap record…. The independent two A-arm suspension front and rear made this a very decent-handling, well balanced car. The 330 [TRI/LM] suffered none of the earlier aerodynamic problems of some Ferraris, which caused them to lift so badly we lost much of the steering control at very high speeds. And it didn’t exhibit that schizophrenic nature of other Ferraris, when they would be nice on the tight, slow parts of the track and yet get nasty on the fast parts, like the section before the old White House turn. Without these strange nose or tail liftings the 330 was a nice, almost pleasant car to drive. “We did have one major problem. Right from the first practice session the clutch would slip when we really got on the engine near the point of greatest torque. As we’d accelerate away from White House, holding the power at that critical rpm while turning the car (which was adding to the load on the engine), the slippage began. We knew the only answer was to treat the car as gently as possible and that the moment the revs would start to mount out of proportion to the degree that the car was accelerating, we would have to sense it and shift. That oftentimes meant we were a gear higher than we cared to be at certain places on the track, but we could live with that. The unspoken thought between us, however, was that the car just couldn’t last.”

    Gendebien got away slowly at the start but used the 330 TRI/LM’s speed to advantage, slicing through almost the entire field to lead the opening lap. Through the Hill/Gendebien pair’s annual Le Mans duel with the ultra-fast Rodriguez brothers they kept the 330 TRI/LM in the lead through virtually the entire race – despite nursing the clutch – and with the retirement of Pedro and Ricardo had a 4-lap lead, which increased to five full laps at the finish.

    With this final victory for the Ferrari Testa Rossa, Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien became the first driving team to win three times at La Sarthe and Gendebien became the first 4-time winner, a stunning record compiled wholly in Ferrari Testa Rossas. 330 TRI/LM s/n 0808’s subsequent history

    Following Le Mans the 330 TRI/LM was sold to Luigi Chinetti’s North American Racing Team. Its real buyer, however, was Don Rodriguez. Having seen the car’s success firsthand he determined to put Pedro in it for the North American season. Pedro won the big car portion of the September 15-16 Double 500 at Bridgehampton in absolutely convincing style, lapping the entire field – which included Augie Pabst in Briggs Cunningham’s bellowing Maserati Tipo 151 coupé – by the race’s midpoint and proceeding to show off in ebullient Pedro Rodriguez style for the balance of the race. He then went on to the Canadian Sports Car GP at Mosport a week later, finishing 2nd. Driven by Masten Gregory at Nassau in December while Pedro was mourning the death of his brother at the Mexican GP, the 330 TRI/LM finished 4th in the Nassau Trophy.

    At Sebring March 23, 1963 Pedro Rodriguez was joined in the N.A.R.T.-entered 330 TRI/LM by 1962 F1 Driving Champion Graham Hill. Easily able to run with the mid-engined 250 P prototypes, the front-engined Testa Rossa was a contender for overall victory. At one point it built up a 3-lap lead over the pursuing P-cars but a series of mechanical and electrical problems ate away at the lead while the drivers struggled with exhaust fumes from a split exhaust manifold. Nevertheless Hill and Rodriguez made the best of a series of tribulations, only yielding second to the Mairesse/Vaccarelli/Bandini Ferrari 250 P in the penultimate hour and bringing the big Testa Rossa home in a solid third place, only two laps behind the winning Surtees/Scarfiotti 250 P.

    N.A.R.T. returned to Le Mans with the 330 TRI/LM in 1963, its power now complemented by wider tires, and once again it proved it had the measure of the Scuderia Ferrari 250 Ps and the rumbling 5-litre Maserati Tipo 151 coupés. The 330 TRI/LM ran securely in third until after midnight when the engine threw a connecting rod in the top speed section between Mulsanne and Indianapolis with Roger Penske at the wheel, creating an instant oil slick for the Testa Rossa’s wide rear tires. It crashed, and while Penske was only slightly injured the same could not be said for the 330 TRI/LM.

    Its racing career, and with it the racing history of front-engined sports-racing cars and the legendary Ferrari Testa Rossa, ended here.

    Subsequent History

    The damaged 0808 was sent back to Ferrari for repairs where it was rebodied, first as a spider and later with a unique coupé body by Fantuzzi. Shipped back to the United States, in 1965 it was sold by Chinetti to Hisashi Okada, a businessman based in New York City. Okada drove this 4-litre Le Mans-winning 330 TRI/LM for nine years on the streets of New York and its environs before succumbing in 1974 to the entreaties of Stanley Nowak on behalf of Pierre Bardinon and selling it for, among other things, a Ferrari 250LM (s/n 5845) which he similarly drove in and out of New York City until 1993.

    Upon acquiring 0808 Pierre Bardinon immediately commenced a complete restoration to its 1962 Le Mans configuration including commissioning the original coachbuilder, Fantuzzi, to re-create its work of 1962. Despite the engine failure at Le Mans in 1963, the 330 TRI/LM still has its original engine. Stamped 0808 with numero interno 46SA, this has been confirmed as the original engine by Ferrari. Completed to a very high standard under the supervision of the experienced staff at Pierre Bardinon’s Mas du Clos collection, it took its place among a peerless collection of some of the world’s finest Ferraris.

    Perhaps the best demonstration of the continuing allure and potency of this unique, final Testa Rossa came several years ago when 0808 and Phil Hill were reunited at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. Nearly forty years after setting the lap record and winning Le Mans by five laps, Hill and the 330 TRI/LM teamed up again on the Goodwood hill climb course, trouncing such later and competently driven opposition as David Piper’s 330 P4 and the Chaparrals.

    Since being acquired in 2002 by the present owner, 0808 has led an active life as part of a small, exclusive collection of the finest and most important sports and sports-racing cars.

    Unlike most cars of this importance, history and value, it has been frequently driven. Its first outing was the 2003 Colorado Grand where it performed flawlessly. In 2004 it was appropriately the centerpiece of the display of significant Ferrari race cars at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. In 2006 it carried its owner on a flawless and satisfying Copper State 1000 until suffering a tire puncture three miles from the finish.

    In the meantime it has even been used frequently for commuting in city traffic, recalling Hisashi Okada’s many years commuting in New York and making 0808 surely the only Le Mans winning Ferrari to serve two owners as a commuter car.

    Throughout its recent history of regular use and enjoyment it has been assiduously maintained regularly by the same experienced mechanic to be always ready for instant use. Recently it had a complete mechanical refurbishing at Wayne Obry’s Motion Products with the explicit charge that 0808 receive everything mechanically that it needed – or wanted – to be ready for the 2007 Copperstate 1000. That work was completed in mid-March of 2007 and it has been driven only on shakedown runs since.

    Some of the finest and most significant sports and sports-racing cars in the world have passed through the current owner’s hands in recent years. He has used each of them regularly, frequently and enthusiastically in his effort to experience their unique, individual physical and emotional sensations. He is effusive in his praise for the Ferrari 330 TRI/LM, describing it as “the best driving experience I’ve ever had…. It is extremely drivable, yet very, very fast.”

    “I don’t collect cars, I use them. This particular car is the all-round best driving experience I have ever had. Speed, power, open air, sound and exclusivity with virtually unmatched race history, it has everything.”

    Summary Ferrari 330 TRI/LM s/n 0808 is the last front-engined Ferrari sports-racer, the highest development of the most famous series of racing cars in history and by far the fastest. By Phil Hill’s own evaluation the 330 TRI/LM is a well-balanced and predictable race car under the most demanding conditions. It is absolutely unique, historic, and the last front-engined car to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Repeatedly proven not only at Le Mans and Sebring but also in daily driving and on open road historic events, it is the final expression of the golden age of front-engined sports-racers, the ultimate Ferrari Testa Rossa.

    Carefully and sympathetically restored to its 1962 Le Mans-winning configuration, bodied by Fantuzzi who created its original coachwork, powered by its original engine and capable of showing its heels to the best mid-engined sports-racers of the late Sixties, it is quite simply the most important Ferrari ever offered for public sale.
     
  20. #20 basman007, May 11, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
  21. Maserati A6 A6TGCS - the 1955 RAC TT Class-winning car
    Coys Auction - Legende et Passion Monaco 21st May 2007

    colour Blue
    drive LHD
    type Cabrio / Roadster
    year 1954
    price P.O.R.
    VAT No
    country Monaco
    Coys Auction - Legende et Passion
    Espace Fontvieille
    Monte Carlo, Monaco

    Monday 21st May 2007 at 17.00

    Before World War Two every single Maserati produced had been a pure racing car, although some were raced in sports trim, and it was during the hostilities that the Bolgna-based concern developed its first purpose-built sports car. The Tipo A6 used a straight-six, single overhead camshaft, 1,488cc engine, similar to that which had been used in the Tipo 6CM Voiturette, installed in a ladder-frame chassis with large diameter side-members. It produced 65bhp via a single twin-choke Weber carburettor, while coil springs/unequal length wishbone suspension was used at the front together with a live, coil spring, rear axle.

    Clothed with neat, Pininfarina-styled, coupe coachwork, the Tipo A6 was launched at the 1947 Geneva Motor Show and in A6G guise, the G denoting an iron engine block, it made its competition debut in the Mille Miglia the same year; alas, the car, using a 1,954cc, 90bhp version of the six cylinder, and driven by Luigi Villoresi, retired with bearing failure. With the advent of the A6GCS, output was increased to 125bhp, the cycle-winged, lightweight machine also sporting a shorter, stiffer chassis and a live rear axle now using semi-elliptic rear springs and single trailing arms. On the car's race debut, two, driven by Villoresi and Alberto Ascari, took first and second places in the Circuit of Modena.. Retirements, however, in various events ensued, although Bracco and Villoresi did achieve a one-two finish in the Dolomite Gold Cup.

    Despite reliability improving, however, further development was put on hold at the end of 1948, Maserati - not least due to the Maserati brothers leaving their eponymous company late the previous year to establish the OSCA marque - deciding instead to concentrate its competition activities on single seaters for privateers to campaign, and amongst those achieving numerous victories were high profile drivers as Juan Manuel Fangio, Guiseppe Farina, Villoresi, Reg Parnell, Prince Bira and Baron de Graffenried.

    A new Formula Two car, the Tipo A6GCM, was ready for the 1951 season, powered by a redesigned version of the A6 engine with a light alloy engine block and twin-plug, twin overhead camshaft cylinder head. Dependent on whether in single seater or sports specification, it produced 177bhp or 165bhp via triple Weber, twin-choke carburettors. The ladder-frame chassis with large diameter main tube members used similar front suspension as before, apart from the addition of a front anti-roll bar, but the live rear axle was now located by radius arms and an A-bracket and used quarter-elliptic springs, while hydraulic shock absorbers were fitted all round.

    This same basic chassis specification, though with semi-elliptic rear springs, was used for the A6GCS sports car, which was reintroduced for 1952. Powered by a 140bhp engine, with equal bore and stroke dimensions giving a capacity of 1,985cc, it was, however, a stop gap model with cycle-wing body and for the following year's Mille Miglia Maserati fielded a team of three revised cars. In the event, Giletti finished sixth overall and Mantovani tenth, the pair also netting first and second places in the 2,000cc class; Musso had been a class leader until he crashed. Impressive results in other Italian events followed but in the Nurburgring 1000km, the A6GCSs, now with Vignale coachwork, were less fortunate: Lang/Bertoni retired with engine problems, Hermann/McAfee were disqualified for using a spare wheel not carried on the car, and Gileti/Marimon lost their class lead just four miles from the finish through engine failure.

    Elsewhere, privateer models were in action, Roy Salvadori in England enjoying much success in a Gilby Engineering-entered car until the arrival of Archie Scott-Brown's Lister-Bristol midway through 1954, while at the end of the year, de Graffenried took his A6GCS to victory in both the Rio de Janeiro and San Paulo GPs. Works entries for 1954 were limited as Maserati concentrated on its Formula One programme, the factory's few results including sixth position for Musso/Gatta at Sebring. In the Mille Miglia, however, Musso, his car fitted with an all-synchromesh gearbox, had raced head to head with the two litre Ferrari Mondial of Vittorio Marzotto, only to lose the battle by just nine seconds and finish third overall; Venezian, meanwhile, having survived a crash, crossed the line two places in arrears. In the Targo Florio a few weeks later, Musso took a strong second place behind the Lancia D24 of Taruffi, while for the Tourist Trophy at Dundrod towards the end of the year, there was a three car factory entry - although only one finished, Musso/Mantovani took the flag in fine style, classified in third place on handicap and at the fifth fastest average speed; Musso also took outright victory in the Naples Grand Prix..

    Of the Maserati sports racing cars that took part in competition during the late 1940s/early 1950s, the A6GCS undoubtedly enjoyed its share of success but for the 1955 season Maserati realised the need for a larger capacity replacement and the car was superceded by the Tipo 300S.

    Chassis 2065, built in 1954, was originally campaigned by Armand Roboly throughout the same year, his impressive results including third in class in the Circuit of Marakesh, class victory in the Coupes de Paris at Montlhery, third overall in the Circuit des Sables d'Olonne, plus second and fifth in class in the Coupes d'Automne and the Coupes du Salon, both at Montlhery. The following year, this A6GCS, in the hands of owner Adrien Loens and Jo Bonnier, was raced at the Easter Meeting at Goodwood and the Grand Prix de Frontieres at Chimay, with a best result of first in class and eighteenth overall in the Ulster Tourist Trophy; 1956 then saw it take a class second in the Elacinthare in Finland, a similar result in the Circuit des Sables, first in class in the Coupes d'Automne and ninth overall/first in class in the Coupes du Salon. Later, during 1958 and 1959, it competed in hillclimbs driven by Urbain Esmingaud, the best results being fourth and third in class at Mont Ventoux in consecutive years.

    Comprehensively restored between 1996 and 1998, and retaining some 70 per cent of its original bodywork plus many other original components, this highly competitive and beautiful Maserati is offered in excellent and race-ready condition. Finely finished in blue paintwork, and with a detailed history file, including a documented and photographic record of the restoration, it comes complete with FIA papers. Eminently eligible for many high profile historic race events, this is a rare chance to acquire an important piece of Maserati sports racing car history which would be a most worthy addition to any serious racing car collection.

    Estimate: EURO Refer Dept.
     
  22. Bizzarrini P 578
    Coys Auction - Legende et Passion Monaco 21st May 2007

    colour Red
    drive LHD
    type Cabrio / Roadster
    year 1976
    price P.O.R.
    VAT No
    country Monaco
    Coys Auction - Legende et Passion
    Espace Fontvieille
    Monte Carlo, Monaco

    Monday 21st May 2007 at 17.00

    A highly talented mechanical engineering graduate, Giotto Bizzarrini began his automobile career in 1953 as a chassis tester with Alfa Romeo. Soon after he became a test driver at Ferrari where, having cured the 250GT's quirky handling, he then headed the experimental department and was also almost single-handedly responsible for the fabulous 250GTO. By late 1961, however, along with similarly disillusioned engineers such as Carlo Chitti, Bizzarrini left the Italian supercar manufacturer. His erstwhile colleagues duly set up ATS while Bizzarrini established an engineering and design consultancy in Livorno.

    To begin with Prototipi Bizzarrini did work for Lamborghini - he would later achieve everlasting fame by designing its sensational four-cam V12 engine - and refrigerator magnate Renzo Rivolta's newly formed Iso concern in Milan. At the latter, Bizzarrini designed the Iso Rivolta, probably the world's first monocoque supercar with a 5.3 litre Chevrolet V8 power and de Dion rear axle. Sales, though, were slow and when Rivolta, who unlike Bizzarrini had no interest in motor sport, rejected racing as a means of promoting his car, Bizzarrini left Iso. Rivolta, however, gave him enough components to build a race car and the result was the Iso-Bizzarrini A3C Grifo; meanwhile Iso produced the A3L Grifo road car.

    Bizzarrini duly competed in the 1964 Le Mans 24 Hours where he took his lightweight Grifo to 9th place and 1st in the over 5.0 litre class; thereafter, he negotiated a deal to manufacture a version of the A3C under his own name. The outcome, launched in 1965, was the GT Strada 5300, a muscular and attractive coupé with steel coachwork by Piero Drogo and similarly powered to the A3C by the 5,345cc iron block V8 allied to a four speed manual gearbox; with 350bhp at 5,400rpm and 375lb.ft at 3,500rpm performance was well into the contemporary supercar league, providing a 165mph maximum speed and 0-60mph in just 6.4 seconds, while coil spring suspension and de Dion axle allowed a suitably high standard of roadholding. Brakes were naturally discs all round behind Borrani cast alloy wheels.

    In 1966 a Spyder version was announced - though only two were ever built - while the bodies were now made by BBM in Modena, following troubles with quality control at Drogo. The exciting Strada 5300 GT, though, was only produced in modest numbers thanks to fierce competition from the de Tomaso Mangusta, AC Cobra and the Chevrolet Corvette, not to mention the Iso Grifo that sired it. Even rarer was the 180mph Strada 5300 Corsa, a stripped out competition version of the road car producing a hefty 405bhp via quadruple Weber carburettors, though competition successes were limited.

    To increase the international appeal of the Bizzarrini name it was also decided to create a mid-engined sports prototype to contest international endurance events. With a glassfibre body jointly penned by Bizzarrini and Giugiaro, the low, sleek and purposeful-looking Tipo P538 was powered by either the Chevrolet 5.3 litre V8 or the Lamborghini 3.9 litre V12, longitudinally-mounted and mated to a four speed gearbox.. Its competition career, however, was short-lived: on its debut at Le Mans in 1966 one car lasted just eight laps before steering arm failure forced retirement from the 24 Hours, while the other was disqualified after 36 laps for crossing the pit road safety line. Sadly, by 1969 Prototipi Bizzarrini Srl. had closed its doors for good. Of the 149 cars it produced, 133 were A3C/Stradas including only some 10 to 12 Corsas.

    Rarer still is the P538. Offically, only six were built, three with each powerplant, but four or five chassis were assembled with varying types of specialist coachwork over the ensuing years. Among them is the unique example offered here. Fitted with a de Tomaso Pantera 5.8 litre Ford V8, believed to be to Group 4 racing specification, allied to a ZF five speed transaxle, it was built by Giotto Bizzarrini himself and completed in late 1976. Finished in red, this stunning motor car comes with a photograph of Bizzarrinni with his creation and a notarised declaration, dated October 15th 1976, from him confirming both its P578-001 chassis number and build completion date of September 29th the same year. Never before offered for sale and presented in excellent condition, this is a ohance to acquire a striking and potent piece of Italian automotive history. Truly unique.

    Estimate: EURO Refer Dept.
     
  23. You drove a 288GTO!?

    Damn man ...
     
  24. #24 ajzahn, May 16, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    Exciting Late Entries

    These include a 1954 Aston Martin DB2/4 Coupe, a rare original left hand drive example, first registered to George Livanos and fitted with a wealth of original works equipment such as Alfin drum brakes etc.; a 1987 Aston Martin V8 Vantage, again an original left hand drive Vantage with just 9.500 km from new and 1986 Aston Martin V8 Vantage Volante LHD, one of the just 29 built by the factory to Prince of Wales specification.

    More noteworthy additions are a 1953 Ferrari 250 MM engine and a c1950s Piaggio Ape Rickshaw.

    >>> www.coys.co.uk/auctions/lot_list.php?id=61
     
  25. #25 ajzahn, May 17, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016

Share This Page