Ferrari – Leggenda e Passione

Discussion in 'Classic Cars' started by ajzahn, Apr 1, 2008.

  1. Ferrari 365 GTB/4 'Daytona'
    year 1973
    Price estimate: 533.800 - 640.560 USD


    Ferrari 365 GTB/4 'Daytona'
    year 1971
    Price estimate: 376.800 - 455.300 USD
     
  2. #27 basman007, Apr 10, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    how many of these valeo F40's/Ferrari's are there?
     
  3. #28 ajzahn, Apr 10, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    maybe just one?

    An F40 with a valeo clutch?
    Yes, it’s true, and done by the Factory for a special customer.

    >>> www.cavallino.com/images/samples/158-ecco.pdf
     
  4. #29 basman007, Apr 10, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    who's the special customer? <A BORDER="0" HREF="http://www.supercars.net/PitLane?displayFAQ=y"><IMG BORDER="0" SRC="pitlane/emoticons/tongue.gif"></A>
     
  5. Clay Ragazzoni ???
     
  6. Why are those Daytona so expensive ? More info ?
     
  7. A classic Ferrari owned by Hollywood legend, James Coburn, and two Formula One cars driven by Michael Schumacher are the star cars at unique auction being held at Maranello, Ferrari�s home, on 18 May 2008 and they lead a long list of some of the best and most famous Ferraris produced during the company�s 61 year history.

    Headlining the list of significant consignments for the single-day the much-anticipated �Ferrari: Leggenda e Passione� auction event is a pair of rare and ultra-desirable California Spyders, a 1951 Ferrari 212 Inter Coupe Pinin Farina with celebrity provenance, and a 1951 Ferrari 340 America Coup� with a superlative racing history.

    In addition to classic Ferraris, there will also be a selection of newer Ferrari models, and items from one of the world�s most important Ferrari memorabilia collections, Jacques Swaters� famed Ferrari Francorchamps Collection.

    �Our upcoming Ferrari Leggenda e Passione auction is set to be a truly historic and international event, highlighting over 50 years of Ferrari history,� says Max Girardo, Managing Director of RM�s European Operations. �We have received tremendous early interest in the event and have secured a magnificent assortment of consignments, including some of the earliest Ferraris produced, making this a �must attend� event for professional collectors and those with a predilection for the Ferrari marque.�

    Headlining the growing list of significant consignments are no less than two rare and ultra-desirable California Spyders � a magnificent 1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder, (s/n 0923GT)and a stunning 1961 Ferrari 250GT SWB California Spyder (s/n 2377GT) with celebrity provenance. Completed on March 3, 1961, 2377GT was shipped to the US in the 1960s after being purchased by Academy Award winning actor, James Coburn, who shared a passion for Italian sports cars with close friend and fellow Ferrari enthusiast, the legendary Steve McQueen. Over the course of his 25-year ownership, Coburn was a regular sight in his Spyder, using it as a daily driver to and from the movie studios.

    Additionally, on weekends, he, along with McQueen and fellow actor James Garner, could often be found testing their driving abilities through the winding Hollywood hills. Throughout Coburn�s ownership, he repainted the vehicle three times, first in dark blue, followed by silver and finally burgundy; today the car appears in its original black and includes extensive documentation relating to its restoration and maintenance.

    Another star attraction with celebrity provenance, and just confirmed for the May auction, is a fabulously restored 1951 Ferrari 212 Inter Coupe Pinin Farina (s/n 0265EU). Fitted with a prototype 3.0-litre 250 type V12 engine, this unique example was purchased new by renowned film director Roberto Rossellini and used on a road trip to Sweden by him and his wife, three-time Academy Award winning actress, Ingrid Bergman.

    Also set to cross the block at the Maranello event is a legendary 1951 Ferrari 340 America Ghia Coupe, (s/n 0150A). Regarded as one of the rarest of all early racing Ferraris, this example was the last of four 340 Americas bodied by Carrozzeria Ghia, and the only one with a superlative racing history. Sold new in 1952 to noted Ferrari patron, Antonio �Tony� Paravano, the car was subsequently shipped to California before making its racing debut at Torrey Pines in July 1952, closely followed by an appearance at the grueling Carrera Panamericana in Mexico, where Jack and Ernie McAfee drove it to a respectable fifth place finish.

    To coincide with the 40th anniversary of the Ferrari Daytona, the May event will also offer an ultra-collectible, award-winning 1971 Ferrari GTS/4 Daytona Spyder, a fully restored 1971 Daytona Coupe; and a totally original 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona, with just one owner from new and 2,500 original miles.

    Other significant Ferraris consignments include: An ultra rare, totally original 1950 Ferrari 166/195S Inter Vignale Berlinetta; a meticulously restored 1961 Ferrari 250GT Pininfarina Cabriolet SII; a restored, highly desirable 1962 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta Competizione, the first production example and one of just three official Competizione models; a fully restored, concours-winning 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4; and magnificent 1971 Ferrari 512M with extensive racing history, including the only hillclimb win for a 512M at Melgno-Borno.

    In addition to the vintage cars, the Maranello auction event will also shine a spotlight on some of Ferrari�s more recent offerings, including: a race-ready 1995 Ferrari 412T2; a 1999 Ferrari 333SP, one of the greatest sports racing cars to have been produced by Ferrari; a pair of factory F1 race cars raced by Michael Schumacher (a 1997 Ferrari F31OB and a 2000 Ferrari F2000); two Ferrari Enzos from the consecutive 2003 and 2004 production years; and a special India Tour model 2008 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti. All of the cars attending the event will be certified by Ferrari Classiche. (Italiaspeed.com)
     
  8. Yes
     
  9. #34 nishav, Apr 21, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
  10. yes thats scheuys. ive got the high rez of that somewhere
     
  11. #36 smellygruby, Apr 25, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
  12. #37 ajzahn, Apr 26, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    The catalogue for Legende et Passion 2008 is now available online at >>> www.coys.co.uk

    The original Legende et Passion sale goes from strength to strength each year, and in conjunction with the Monaco Historic Grand Prix weekend, there are a number of exciting highlights.

    These include two coach-built 12 cylinder Ferrari shooting-brakes, the Daytona and the famous Vignale, both unique one-off examples, a road-legal Maserati MC12 Corsa � the only road legal MC12 Competition car in the world, an ex-Le Mans Porsche 550 RS Spyder, an ex-Le Mans NART Ferrari Daytona Competitione, one of the 15 original Comp. Daytonas as well as a Group 4 specification Daytona built in the Michellotto factory, a Miura S, Innes Ireland�s Ferrari 330 GT/TR Spyder, Phil Hill�s E-Type Coupe� With the late entries already consigned, we are expecting a total of nearly 100 cars on the day.
     
  13. I want that 275 GTB/4, and also the F40s.
     
  14. cool, but christ alot of those cars are just absurdly expensive.
     
  15. I'm sure a number of those cars will sell to a guy named 'Rob Meyers' to make the results look that much better. Watch the cars that show up at Meadowbrook and Monterey this year...
     
  16. #41 ajzahn, Apr 30, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    Coys at Monaco Saturday 10th May 2008 - Preview


    Coys has pulled out all the stops for this sale. With an entry that already includes two rare Ferrari shooting brakes, a genuine competitzione ‘Daytona’, and three Miuras, one of the highlights must be the only road-legal Maserati MC12 Corsa in the world.

    Unlike the rarer-than-Enzo genuine road cars, this one is chassis 001 in the run of just 12 Maserati Versione Corse machines, intended only for track day use (in the manner of the Ferrari FXX). Its 755bhp V12 will punch the 1150kg car from 0-124mph in just 6.4 seconds, and on to a maximum of 207mph. A fantastic machine at a fantastic estimate? ‘Refer Department’ for price please.

    The 1972 Ferrari 365GTB/4 ‘Daytona’ Competizione is an ex-North American Racing Team car that has run in period at Le Mans and Daytona, It’s another one that will require a ‘phone call to Coys for its price, and as they usually say “If you have to ask…” The two shooting brakes will likewise require communication with the Coys auction team. They are based on a 1968 Ferrari 330 GT and a 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 ‘Daytona’, with both having new interiors to match their exterior restyling. Very 1970s.

    I’ll get on to the more affordable lots in a minute, but before I do, mention must be made of the 1954 Porsche 550 Spyder. This is a car that finished in 18th place overall in the famously fated 1955 Le Mans 24 Hours. No estimate again – and you know what to do by now...

    Big-hitting entries apart, what else is ‘on the card’? There are several little Abarths, ranging from a nice twin-cam 1959 Abarth 750 Bialbero Record Monza for EURO 60,000 - 90,000, via an ex-Targa Florio 1965 Abarth 1300 OT (EURO 175,000 - 200,000), to an ex-Brescia Corse 1970 Abarth SE10 at EURO 170,000 - 200,000. The latter will make a nice change from a Lola or Chevron, and go well at an event such as the Vernasca Silver Flag.

    Three Lamborghini Miuras isn’t bad going, and buyers can choose from a trio of flamboyantly painted cars, all in the high-EURO 200,000 to EURO 330,000 price range. There’s also a 1976 Lamborghini Urraco for a more attainable EURO 24,000 - 28,000.

    It’s customary to include the archetypal cars of the Cote d’Azur in any Monaco sale, so you’d expect the 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing (EURO 390,000 - 413,000) and 1961 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster (EURO 360,000 - 385,000), not to mention the 1972 Ferrari 246GT Dino at EURO 110,000 - 140,000, and the 1964 Porsche 356 Cabriolet for EURO 70,000 - 80,000, all present and correct in the 200+ page catalogue.

    Finishing on a couple of Classic Driver favourites, how about the two-tone 1960 Lancia Flaminia Zagato Sports (EURO 40,000 - 52,000), or the 1963 Facel Vega HK500 for EURO 75,000 - 90,000? And for cheeky style, nothing outranks a wicker-seated Fiat 500 Jolly Ghia. Coys’ example, built in 1970 and complete with fringed ‘Surrey Top,’ will set you back EURO 23,000 - 28,000.

    Before the motor car lots Coys will sell a small selection of collectors’ items including the steering wheel from the prototype Ford GT40, as tested (and 'despised', according to the catalogue) by Roy Salvadori. It carries an estimate of EURO 8,000 - 10,000.

    The Coys Légende et Passion Sale at Monaco will be held at:

    Espace Fontvielle
    Monaco
    On View:
    Friday 9th May 2008 12:00 - 19:00
    Saturday 10th May 2008 from 10:00

    Sale:

    Saturday 10th May 2008
    Collectors' Items 14.30
    Motor Cars at 15.00

    Admission by catalogue only - admits two


    >>> www.coys.co.uk/auctions/lot_list.php?id=76
     
  17. #42 ajzahn, Apr 30, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    Coys at Monaco Saturday 10th May 2008 - Preview


    Coys has pulled out all the stops for this sale. With an entry that already includes two rare Ferrari shooting brakes, a genuine competitzione �Daytona�, and three Miuras, one of the highlights must be the only road-legal Maserati MC12 Corsa in the world.

    Unlike the rarer-than-Enzo genuine road cars, this one is chassis 001 in the run of just 12 Maserati Versione Corse machines, intended only for track day use (in the manner of the Ferrari FXX). Its 755bhp V12 will punch the 1150kg car from 0-124mph in just 6.4 seconds, and on to a maximum of 207mph. A fantastic machine at a fantastic estimate? �Refer Department� for price please.

    The 1972 Ferrari 365GTB/4 �Daytona� Competizione is an ex-North American Racing Team car that has run in period at Le Mans and Daytona, It�s another one that will require a �phone call to Coys for its price, and as they usually say �If you have to ask�� The two shooting brakes will likewise require communication with the Coys auction team. They are based on a 1968 Ferrari 330 GT and a 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 �Daytona�, with both having new interiors to match their exterior restyling. Very 1970s.

    I�ll get on to the more affordable lots in a minute, but before I do, mention must be made of the 1954 Porsche 550 Spyder. This is a car that finished in 18th place overall in the famously fated 1955 Le Mans 24 Hours. No estimate again � and you know what to do by now...

    Big-hitting entries apart, what else is �on the card�? There are several little Abarths, ranging from a nice twin-cam 1959 Abarth 750 Bialbero Record Monza for EURO 60,000 - 90,000, via an ex-Targa Florio 1965 Abarth 1300 OT (EURO 175,000 - 200,000), to an ex-Brescia Corse 1970 Abarth SE10 at EURO 170,000 - 200,000. The latter will make a nice change from a Lola or Chevron, and go well at an event such as the Vernasca Silver Flag.

    Three Lamborghini Miuras isn�t bad going, and buyers can choose from a trio of flamboyantly painted cars, all in the high-EURO 200,000 to EURO 330,000 price range. There�s also a 1976 Lamborghini Urraco for a more attainable EURO 24,000 - 28,000.

    It�s customary to include the archetypal cars of the Cote d�Azur in any Monaco sale, so you�d expect the 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing (EURO 390,000 - 413,000) and 1961 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster (EURO 360,000 - 385,000), not to mention the 1972 Ferrari 246GT Dino at EURO 110,000 - 140,000, and the 1964 Porsche 356 Cabriolet for EURO 70,000 - 80,000, all present and correct in the 200+ page catalogue.

    Finishing on a couple of Classic Driver favourites, how about the two-tone 1960 Lancia Flaminia Zagato Sports (EURO 40,000 - 52,000), or the 1963 Facel Vega HK500 for EURO 75,000 - 90,000? And for cheeky style, nothing outranks a wicker-seated Fiat 500 Jolly Ghia. Coys� example, built in 1970 and complete with fringed �Surrey Top,� will set you back EURO 23,000 - 28,000.

    Before the motor car lots Coys will sell a small selection of collectors� items including the steering wheel from the prototype Ford GT40, as tested (and 'despised', according to the catalogue) by Roy Salvadori. It carries an estimate of EURO 8,000 - 10,000.

    The Coys L�gende et Passion Sale at Monaco will be held at:

    Espace Fontvielle
    Monaco
    On View:
    Friday 9th May 2008 12:00 - 19:00
    Saturday 10th May 2008 from 10:00

    Sale:

    Saturday 10th May 2008
    Collectors' Items 14.30
    Motor Cars at 15.00

    Admission by catalogue only - admits two


    >>> www.coys.co.uk/auctions/lot_list.php?id=76
     
  18. 1952 Ferrari Vignale Competition Alluminium SWB Body

    Estimate: €85,000-95,000

    Lot 220

    Originally built in 1952 by Vignale of Torino as a one-off competition alloy coupé with external fuel filler, lightweight plexi rear and door windows to rebody Ferrari 166MM Touring Barchetta 0036M after a racing accident in 1950. The Ferrari Vignale body is in excellent condition and is painted in dark Ferrari red with the original yellow Ferrari Cavallino emblem on the front bonnet and original blue, black and silver Vignale emblems located on both sides in front of the doors. It has complete working Veglia Ferrari instrumentation, wiring to instrumentation, lights and engine compartment, a chrome bonnet lift, alluminum front grill and surround, complete light fixtures with original Marchal headlights in good condition, special alloy " hidden " door handles, excellent alloy parking brake lever, black leather racing seats, diamond pattern leather interior, chrome rear licence plate lights and rear turn and stop lights, rear chrome trunk racing tie-downs with springs. Door interiors are in black leather and complete with original Vignale alloy close handles with black inserts, alloy window wind up levers and functioning ash tray and glove box.

    The 166MM that it was built for raced in various events such as the 1988 Mille Miglia and 1988 Nurburgring Historic races with this actual body. All is documented in Marcel Massini's "Ferrari by Vignale" book with a beautiful color photo on page 41 and further documentation on pages 64 and 65 under chassis number 0036M. Interested parties should note that the chassis, chassis number, steering wheel, wheels and tires and external filler cap are not included in the sale and that the chassis number mentioned above belongs to an existing Ferrari Touring Barchetta and cannot be used with this body or any chassis later used with this body.
     
  19. Lot 225

    1968 Ferrari 330 GT Shooting Brake

    Registration no: EU Registered
    Chassis no: 07963
    Estimate: Refer Department


    Launched at the Brussels Motor Show in January 1964 the Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 was an intended replacement for the successful 250 GTE. It was powered by the 209 engine previously used in the 400 Superamerica, which with various improvements but slight detuning now yielded 300bhp at 6,600rpm, sufficient to provide a top sped of 152mph and 0-60mph acceleration in 6.3 seconds. The wheelbase was about two inches longer than that of the 250, and Koni adjustable shock absorbers were fitted as standard, while the bodywork was altogether more harmonious and essential than that of its predecessor, giving the 330 GT a particularly attractive sharpness of line; the car was also spacious and comfortable, living up well to its GT 2+2 name.

    The late Paul Frere, the noted Belgian racing driver and automotive journalist, road tested a 330 GT 2+2 late in 1966. He came away suitably impressed: "In handling, this car is exactly like all Ferraris which I have driven before ... It is close to being as neutral as one could want... But the most impressive feature of the handling of the 330 is the solidness with which it changes direction, particularly in S-bends, where it tracks with about the same precision as a modern race car".

    American Ferrari importer Luigi Chinetti, a man responsible for several noted special-bodied Ferraris, was the instigator of the one-off shooting brake coachwork on this striking 330 GT. Created by Italian design studio Vignale - notably it was the last car produced by its eponymous founder Alfredo - the styling of the sharp-edged body differed entirely from the original Pininfarina design and incorporated completely new panels throughout, most notably those that form the fully enveloping and slatted treatment covering both the headlamps and the rear lights.

    Attractively finished in metallic green with tan and fawn interior trim - and with only 12,742 miles recorded since new - this eye-catching Ferrari, offering high speed luggage carrying with truly unique and distinctive styling, is presented in excellent all round condition.
     
  20. 1957 Porsche 356 with 200 bhp engine

    Registration no: EU registeredn
    Chassis no: 101487
    Estimate: €90,000-120,000

    Lot 244

    There are numerous reasons why the 356 series came into being, and also why Porsche became a major sports car manufacturer; the main one is that Professor Porsche was very impressed with what Piero Dusio was doing with uprated Fiat parts in the construction of his Cisitalias. These were excellent little sports and racing cars and Dr. Porsche wondered if he could do the same with Volkswagen parts. The first 356 was sold in July 1948, and production continued right through to 1965 in various guises and with numerous engines.

    As the company's first production model, the Porsche 356 set a new standard for small sports cars and gained its laurels in all manner of circuit racing and rallying.

    In October 1955 the 356A model was introduced; numerous innovations came with this new car based upon the experiences of the initial 356 series. The engine, suspension and transmission were all updated resulting in a far

    superior car. Three body styles were offered, all built by Reutter in Stuttgart: the coupe, the Speedster, and the cabriolet.

    This 356A is a serious Porsche fast road or racing machine in all respects in that it was conprehensively rebuilt in 2007 to -as the vendor describe - Corsa - or racing specification.

    Most importantly the car is running with a correct 4 cylinder 2400cc engine that produces a huge 200 bhp - which in such a lightweight

    machine makes for a very quick car.

    The car also has the added benefit of front wheel disc brakes in order to control and stop this fast and nimble car.

    There car be fewer machines so satisfying to own and drive than a well developed Porschge 356 Coupe - a classic in any event and a fantastic all-rounder!
     
  21. 1954 Porsche 550 Spyder Ex-Le Mans



    Registration no:
    Chassis no: 550-0016
    Estimate: Refer Department

    Lot 234

    It was in 1948 that the first ever Porsche Spyder won its class in an Innsbruck road race driven by Herbert Kaes. The car, however, was a one-off machine with spaceframe chassis and never destined for production. Two years later Frankfurt Volkswagen dealer Walter Glockler built his own VW-badged Spyder using a ladder frame chassis with Porsche 356-style, VW trailing arm/torsion bar suspension and powered by a 48bhp, 1,086cc Porsche flat-four cylinder engine. With it he won the West German 1,100cc Sports Car Championship and in so doing the beginning of a strong relationship with Porsche was established.

    Glockler duly built a second Spyder, this time carrying a Porsche badge and powered by an 85bhp, 1,488cc Porsche works engine with roller bearings, as used in the successful 356 competition coupes, and with leading arm rear suspension. The following year a third car was built using a conventional 356 floorpan, a rear-mounted engine and trailing arm rear suspension designed to produce less quirky handling; two further examples were built for customers.

    In the meanwhile Porsche was designing a quad-camshaft, type 547, 1,498cc flat four cylinder engine and by 1953 had found sufficient funding to build its own Spyder model. Power came from a 98bhp, 1,498cc, overhead valve flat four cylinder, as fitted to the 1500 Super. Glockler used the combination to good effect by winning the car's first race at Nurburgring and the Porsche, complete with hardtop, then won its class in both the Le Mans 24 Hours and the Carrera Panamericana. A revised Spyder was subsequently completed with a 117bhp, type 547 engine, while longer arms were employed in the rear suspension, allowing trailing links to be used for improved stability.

    This was followed by the launch of the prototype 550/1500 RS production racer at the 1953 Paris Motor Show, a revised version of which appeared at the following year's Brussels Motor Show, complete with 'big fin' rear bodywork to counter drag for the road specification windscreen. With this Hans Hermann and Herbert Linge - after shooting under a level crossing and narrowly missing a train - took not only sixth place overall and first in the Sports 1500 class in the Mille Miglia, but also third place overall and first in class in the Carrera Panamericana.

    The same year, 1954, production of the aluminium bodied 550/1500RS commenced, the car now simply renamed the Spyder and priced at a cost equivalent to around £100,000 today. Victories in both the Sports 1,100 and 1,500cc classes at Le Mans came the following year, the works-entered car featuring a semi-spaceframe chassis and a five speed gearbox. When production of the 550 Spyder ceased in 1956, just 78 examples, excluding the works machines, had been built.

    This particular Spyder, chassis 550-0016, manufactured on January 20 1955, was successfully run in the Le Mans 24 Hours race the same year. Driven by Gustave Olivier and owner Josef Jeser, and powered by a 1,089cc, four camshaft engine and benefiting from considerable Porsche factory assistance, it finished in 18th place overall and in second place in the Sports 1,100cc class, having completed 234 laps at an average speed of 131.47kph/81.69mph; very soon after Le Mans the Porsche, which was painted white and carried race number 65, was sold minus its four camshaft engine to a German buyer who is believed to have kept the car until 1963. Purchased by the vendor for a modest £150 in 1973 from a Lisbon domiciled German collector who had owned the 550 for 10 years, during which time the latter competed in local Portuguese races, the car, which had been fitted with a standard Porsche 356, 1,498cc engine, remained unused and in storage prior to a recent and complete restoration.

    Finished in silver with blue trim, this extremely rare and highly desirable 550 Spyder - pictured in action in Porsches at Le Mans by Dominique Pascal - is described as being in good condition. Eminently eligible for numerous prestigious historic race meetings, this Porsche has the potential to be extremely competitive in the right hands while also being a highly exhilarating road car. One for the serious Porsche collector.
     
  22. 1972/197 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake



    Registration no: EU taxes paid
    Chassis no: 15275
    Estimate: Refer Department

    Lot 250

    The first cars to bear the name of Enzo Ferrari appeared only 50 years ago, but in that time they have built a legend for delivering uncompromising performance from their V12 power units whilst clothed in some of the most exciting and elegant Italian coachwork designs. From the earlier 275 GTB/4 a natural development was the larger engined 365 GTB/4 (commonly known as the Daytona after the car's strong result in the 24 hour race of the same name in 1967) and this was the swansong for the successful front-engined berlinetta series. The deliberately aggressive shape styled by Pininfarina and the uncompromising mechanical specification ensured its success in the very demanding sports car market. The 352bhp delivered by the race-bred engine was delivered via a five-speed rear transaxle mounted in a welded steel tubular chassis frame. Independent road tests gave a top speed of over 170mph in standard form, which in the early '70s was an amazing feat. Such capability confirmed the 365 GTB/4 as the last and fastest in the long line of competition-bred front-engined Ferrari grand touring cars.

    This spectacular left-hand drive Daytona was converted to carry a one-off shooting brake body in 1975 by English specialist coachbuilder Panther Westwinds and is featured in The Ferrari Daytona by Pat Brayden. Commissioned by a discerning and arguably somewhat eccentric gentleman enthusiast, its styling was courtesy of American designer Bob Gittleman working under the guidance of American Ferrari importer Luigi Chinetti and compatriot Gene Garfinkel. Of the original Daytona coupe body only the bonnet and windscreen remain, with every other panel having been designed to enhance the Ferrari's classic lines and the treatment of the rear differing most obviously from the coupe; here, rather than a conventional rear door, two gullwing side doors not only provide access to the luggage bay but also greatly increase the car's glass area and its feeling of spaciousness.

    Finished in black with beige interior trim, this most exclusive and versatile of all Daytonas is presented in superb and original all round condition, commensurate with its astonishing low mileage of just 3,864 miles from new. Truly a Ferrari for the discerning collector - which was last seen in public at the press preview day for this year's Brooklands Double Twelve Concours d'Elegance - its sale represents an opportunity as rare as the car itself.
     
  23. 1959 Mercedes-Benz Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa Recreation


    Registration no: EU Registered
    Chassis no: TBA
    Estimate: Refer Department

    Lot 243

    The Ferrari Testa Rossa has long been immortalised as one of the greatest sports-racing cars of all time, not to mention as the most successful of all front-engined Ferraris. Although certainly not at the forefront of technology even in its time - it had a fairly rudimentary spaceframe, styling rather than aerodynamics and primitive suspension - one cannot deny the car its many wins, its glorious sound and the magic of its style.

    The evolutionary 1959 version of the Testa Rossa was immediately identifiable by its body, which featured full front wings and a Perspex air intake bulge over the carburettors. Other changes included new disc brakes to replace the outdated drums, a five speed gearbox and an overall weight loss of 165lb. The TR59, as it is commonly known, was reserved for Scuderia Ferrari and driven by such high calibre drivers as Phil Hill, Olivier Gendebien, Jean Behra, Dan Gurney, Pedro and Ricardo Rodriguez and Tony Brooks.

    Formerly the property of racing legend Innes Ireland, this superb recreation is one of five such cars commissioned by Alistair Walker which was built by Jim Rose in 1992 specifically for racing legend and former works Ferrari driver Innes Ireland. Constructed around the chassis and running gear of a 1964 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2, it is powered by the same car's unmodified 3,967cc, twin overhead camshaft, V12 engine; the latter, breathing through a sextet of Weber carburettors, is mated to a four speed gearbox with electrically operated overdrive. Superb in every detail, the car, the seats of which are trimmed in Ireland's own family tartan, is featured in his book All Arms and Elbow together with pictures of him at his wedding to Jean Howeth.

    The subject of a comprehensive inspection and road test report in 2005, as a result of which £12,600 was expended on relevant rectification work, this quite stunning and highly useable Testa Rossa is presented in excellent all round condition. This sale represents a rare opportunity to acquire not only a sensational looking and performing Ferrari, but also the former property of one of the great drivers and characters of international motor racing in the 1950s and 1960s.
     
  24. 1967 Lamborghini Miura S

    Registration no: EU Registered
    Chassis no: 3922
    Estimate: €290,000-330,000

    Lot 235

    The Monaco Grand Prix Weekend of 1966 holds a special place in the hearts of Lamborghini enthusiasts. It was only a couple of weeks after the surprise presentation of the new and revolutionary Miura at the Geneva Motor Show, where it had created a considerable stir amongst the public. Ferruccio Lamborghini had always had a knack for shrewd marketing and publicity, and at Monaco he pulled off one of his greatest coups. It was one of the most important weekends of the jet-set season, and as always Lamborghini had reservations in the best hotels and clubs in town.

    Fully recognising the significance of the unofficial but much admired 'shop window' in the Place du Casino, filled the evening before the Grand Prix with the most expensive and handsome cars in the world (usually occupied by the richest men and the most beautiful girls in Europe), Lamborghini sent the Miura prototype straight there and had it parked right in front of the Hotel de Paris, where it was left on show for the whole Saturday afternoon. Immediately it outshone and aged all of the Ferraris, Aston Martins and Maseratis in the square.

    By the evening there was a large crowd of people gathering around to catch a glimpse of the fabulous orange Lamborghini; at this point Ferruccio himself just 'happened' to chance by with a friend. He pushed through the crowd and climbed into the car with a casual and natural air, then inserted the key and turned on the engine. There was a bellow from the exhaust and a gasp of excitement from the admiring crowd: this fantastic car was actually real! Critics and competitors who had claimed it would remain a static show car were forced to eat their words, particularly when the next day, much to their annoyance, local hero Louis Chiron was driven around the track by Bob Wallace in the Miura, taking pride of place as the official race-opening car before the Grand Prix.

    In the years that followed the Miura P400 became known as the car to own, and jumping the long queue of bookings was synonymous with assertion of status. Painted in the bright colours that Bertone had chosen for his masterpiece ('Rosso Miura', orange, lime green, canary yellow and purple were the favourites) the cars were admired by all and met with delirious praise from the international press.

    A natural process of evolution and improvement was maintained throughout the life of the Miura, and in 1968 the 'S' version (S for Spinto, or tuned) appeared. Mechanically, engine output rose from 350bhp at 7,000rpm to 370bhp at 7,700rpm, the car had new Pirelli tyres to improve road holding, and the brakes received ventilated discs; inside the cabin electric windows were installed and air conditioning, along with leather upholstery, became optional. A number of other cosmetic detail changes were also made. Faster, more stable, with better brake power and better finished, it was a fine step forward from its already sensational sister.

    Supplied new in 1969 to an owner in Switzerland, this Miura S had by November 1993 moved to France, at which time it had red paintwork; five years later it was in the hands of another owner in Belgium undergoing work and painted yellow. By February 2004 it was in Italy where it underwent an engine rebuild, the odometer then showing 46,107 kilometres recorded, and was re-painted in the current and classic combination of lime green with beige seats and door trim and complementary brown dashboard and centre console.

    More recently, this Miura S had both its engine (number 2793, matching the chassis number) and gearbox rebuilt by renown marque specialist Top Motors of Nonantola, Italy, the engine work including fitment of 12 new pistons and a conversion allowing it to run on unleaded petrol, and since which the car has covered fewer than 400 kilometres with the engine still in the process of being run-in. The chassis's condition is such that restoration was not required while the bodywork, which displays perfect panel fit and beautiful paintwork, is also in fine order, as is the near perfect interior which includes carpets in as new condition..

    Described as being in excellent general condition, with suspension and brakes also performing perfectly, and supplied with French Carte Grise registration papers, this evocative and excitingly rapid Lamborghini is highly recommended.
     
  25. 1969 Lamborghini Miura P400

    Registration no: EU taxes paid
    Chassis no: 3192
    Estimate: €275,000-300,000

    Lot 219

    It is fair to say that before the Miura Lamborghini produced some outstanding Grand Touring cars which, despite their superlative mechanical specifications, somehow lacked a definable persona. All of this was to change on the 10th of March 1966, when the Geneva Motor Show opened its doors to the public. Sitting on the Lamborghini stand next to a 400 GT sat the very first Miura, completed only days before. Finished in a striking orange-red hue, the car caused a sensation. Its mid-engined V12 layout was in itself highly innovative, but it was the extraordinarily flamboyant body by Marcello Gandini of Bertone that provided the masterly final touch. With 325hp on tap from the 3,929cc engine, the car was capable via its five speed gearbox of 0-60mph in 5.5 seconds and nearly 180mph in the hands of the brave, which was more than a match for any other road-going production car.

    Output soon built up as it became a favourite among pop stars, racing drivers and other wealthy playboys; after all, the Miura was outrageously different and certainly more sophisticated than its arch rival the Ferrari 275 GTB/4, or even its successor the Daytona. Production for 1967 reached 111 cars, rising to a record 184 in 1968. This was, indeed, the car in which to be seen in the 1960s, the very last word in style, speed and outright sexiness; the sort of car that made children weak at the knees, women swoon and traffic stop in all directions when it passed.

    Alas, the Miura's heyday was to end with the disappearance of the Swinging Sixties and the ensuing tendency towards greater moderation in people's tastes. Production ceased late in 1972 after a mere 763 cars had been built, and they are today the most highly prized of all Lamborghinis.

    Manufactured on October 30th 1967 and delivered new to a Paris buyer, this superb Miura, an original 'light chassis' first series car with matching engine and chassis numbers, has a mere 46,560 kilometres recorded on the odometer. Completely restored some ten years ago - since when the car has covered minimal mileage - the engine and mechanical components were fine-tuned by former French Lamborghini importer Monsieur Ciclet, and more recently the car was serviced by a Lamborghini specialist in Italy who also rebuilt the gearbox with new satellite gears and synchromesh hubs to as new condition at a cost of around ­8,000.

    Other recent work includes rebuilt headlight motors and controls and headlight interior chrome restored to as new condition. Inside, new black leather trim has been installed which is in excellent condition, as are the gauges, switches and seat headrests, while the carpets are also in good condition. In addition, the bodywork, which was re-painted in the 1990s, displays good panel fit, all the windows are intact, as are the original sunscreens; the paintwork, however, does show some small minor cracks, as is often the case in older restorations.

    Strikingly finished in its original yellow with complementary black interior, and having recently benefited from a transmission overhaul, service and road test, this classic and first of the mid-engined supercars - the 85th of only 125 built and which runs and drives superbly - is offered in excellent restored condition complete with Monte Carlo registration papers.
     

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