How do the flames work?

Discussion in '2002 Jaguar XKR Trans-Am' started by Josh427, Aug 9, 2002.

  1. Re: How do the flames work?

    By turning it into an entirely different engine.<!-- Signature -->
     
  2. Ive seen it on several race cars like the GT3 but how does it work. I know a guy that does it on an old musclecar by running the engine rich and then has a spark plug system built in the exhaust. How do race cars do it.<!-- Signature -->
     
  3. Re: How do the flames work?

    actually, what ur probably seeing isn't a special system but burning fuel. this is not unlike top-fuel dragsters. i noticed in the rolex that the flames often poppped out around turns, when drivers often downshifted, meaning the revs went up, which meant more fuel went through the system, which means some of it was probably still burning going down the exhaust. i'm not completely sure of this, but with the advanced timing of the engines, i would be willing to bet this is burning fuel.<!-- Signature -->
     
  4. Re: How do the flames work?

    you people are all stupid ... what happens is the driver lifts the throttle as he enters the turn.. thus there is unburned fuel that get sent to the really hot exhaust where it ignites.. that is why you get flames spewing out of the exhaust<!-- Signature -->
     
  5. Re: How do the flames work?

    <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from bonkersnavy</i>
    <b>you people are all stupid ... what happens is the driver lifts the throttle as he enters the turn.. thus there is unburned fuel that get sent to the really hot exhaust where it ignites.. that is why you get flames spewing out of the exhaust</b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->

    hey easy with the insults. he didnt know so he asked. thats part of what this place is for, you know.
     
  6. Re: How do the flames work?

    If the driver lifts the gas less fuel is injected into the engine, why are there flames.
    Could someone explain the way that rally cars use fuel to keep the turbo spinning when shifting?<!-- Signature -->
     
  7. Re: How do the flames work?

    The turbo in any car should keep spinning, they run off exhaust gases. When the engine is turning, the turbo will spin.

    I'd say that in this car (and any other car which flames come out of the exhaust for that matter), its just that in racing form, they run the engines very very rich. Who cares about the flames or the extra fuel consumption, they have money. By running it with too much fuel, its just going to shoot flames. Running it with 'just the right amount' could result in a power loss if 'just the right amount' wasn't actually enough.

    I don't know if that made much sense.. I think you'll understand.
     
  8. Re: How do the flames work?

    It's basically just the unburned fuel ignited by the hot exhaust....as pointed out by many, racing car do run richer fuel mixture.....<!-- Signature -->
     
  9. Rally turbo flames

    Rally cars keep the turbo spinning by what is called 'anti-lag.' Basically when the driver lifts, the engine management continues to pump fuel through the engine, but retards the timing until the unburnt air/fuel mixture has almost left the combustion chamber. At this late point the spark plug fires and combined with the hot exhaust manifold causes the mixture to explode in the exhaust manifold, just before the turbo. The result, the explosion forces through the turbo keeping it spinning at a high rate.

    This is also where that cracking / popping sound comes from in rally cars, and part of the reason that they shoot flames.
     
  10. Re: How do the flames work?

    how can a factory mustang be modified to give this kind of power(650hp)? how much would it cost?
     
  11. Re: How do the flames work?

    ive also seen peopl run propane hoses to their exaust and add spark plugs. all i can say is, big flames! they were probably 4-5 feet behind the back bumper. It was an old pink bel air that did this
     
  12. Re: How do the flames work?

    Your mother farts!
     
  13. Re: How do the flames work?

    <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from SpecGen</i>
    <b>The turbo in any car should keep spinning, they run off exhaust gases. When the engine is turning, the turbo will spin.

    I'd say that in this car (and any other car which flames come out of the exhaust for that matter), its just that in racing form, they run the engines very very rich. Who cares about the flames or the extra fuel consumption, they have money. By running it with too much fuel, its just going to shoot flames. Running it with 'just the right amount' could result in a power loss if 'just the right amount' wasn't actually enough.

    I don't know if that made much sense.. I think you'll understand.</b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->

    Turbos can indeed stop spinning while the engine is running. This is where blow-off/bypass valves have entered the picture. See, when a driver lets off the throttle to shift, the throttle plate (or butterfly) closes (not all the way) causing a reflected pressure wave to travel back through the intake system towards the the compressor (or impeller) side of the turbo. When this pressure wave hits the spinning impeller, it can cause the turbo to "stall". The blow-off (or bypass) valve relieves this pressure so the turbo will stay spinning.
     
  14. Re: How do the flames work?

    With some of the older racing (and some street) engines that had carburetors, closing the throttle at high engine speed (like lifting off for a corner) would cause a very high intake velocity after the throttle and would thus cause a somewhat large pressure drop across the fuel metering venturi (or fuel metering section of the carburetor throat, which is also a veturi, it depends on how the carburetor is constructed) causing more fuel to be dumped in to the cylinders than was necessary to keep the engine running. So, unburnt fuel could get into the hot exhaust system (mainly during intake and exhaust valve overlap) and ignite in the exhaust system causing a popping sound and possibly flames.

    I imagine with the newer racing engines that most of these guys are right... they are just running really rich so unburnt fuel can be dumped into the exhaust system. Although, not ALL racing engines run rich. Indy cars (CART, not IRL) actually run a little lean.
     
  15. Re: How do the flames work?

    <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from chicane</i>
    <b>Your mother farts!</b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->whatoes thathave to do with the topic??? <!-- Signature -->
     
  16. Re: How do the flames work?

    <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from love of cars</i>
    <b><!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from chicane</i>
    <b>Your mother farts!</b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->whatoes thathave to do with the topic??? </b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->

    Farts, or flatulence, as they are often referred to as, are composed of combustable methane gas which forms as a by-product of digestion. If one were to introduce a flame at the moment of flatulence expulsion...<!-- Signature -->
     
  17. Re: How do the flames work?

    That's basically what the guy above you said so I"m not sure if he's really that supid!!!!!
     
  18. Re: How do the flames work?

    it's actually a brief flash when the car downshifts. there's no special effects involved. rallye cars do it all the time.
     
  19. Re: How do the flames work?

    he is right tho
     
  20. Re: How do the flames work?

    It's called Backfireing.
     
  21. Re: How do the flames work?

    it is backfiring..
    but it has something to do with the exhaust and the braking system of the car.
    and yes many cars have this.
     

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