++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

Discussion in '2001 Honda Dualnote Concept' started by MarkM91286, Aug 9, 2002.

  1. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    Honda is the best of the bst when it comes to hp per liter. 400 hp out of a v6 in a HYBRID car!<!-- Signature -->
     
  2. if with the s2000 they put 240 hp in a 4 cyl , what would happen if they made a v12 engine , wiht a v6 engine they made 608 hp for the le mans entrant nsx castrol mugen gt ,who wants a mclaren i want a v12 car made by honda
     
  3. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from MarkM91286</i>
    <b>Honda is the best of the bst when it comes to hp per liter. 400 hp out of a v6 in a HYBRID car!</b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->
    And Naturally aspirated.<!-- Signature -->
     
  4. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    yeah fellas, thats pretty good, but other companies can do it too, don't kid yourselves. GM has a 2.2 naturally aspirated 4cyl with over 700hp and i'm pretty sure ford has something pretty comparable, both in the concept stage. <!-- Signature -->
     
  5. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from hsckris</i>
    <b>yeah fellas, thats pretty good, but other companies can do it too, don't kid yourselves. GM has a 2.2 naturally aspirated 4cyl with over 700hp and i'm pretty sure ford has something pretty comparable, both in the concept stage. </b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->Prove??<!-- Signature -->
     
  6. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    You dont know shit efficency sure as hell will win you races.

    While they are getting 400hp out of a 6L honda will be getting in exess of 600hp.
     
  7. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    You guys have a very good point. The new 2002 Mitsubishi Eclipse GST has 200 hp out of a 2 liter I-4 and the new 2002 Toyota Celica GT-S has 180 hp out of a 1.8 liter I-4. Both of those boil down to 100 hp/liter. The 2002 Lotus Esprit has 100 hp/liter also out of a Turbo V-8. The MKIV Toyota Supra Twin Turbo has 100+ hp/liter also. Please check the B.Engineering Edonis on this site under B. The car is ugly as all hell but it looks as if it contains a Honda V-12 when you look at the HP per liter. It is a Twin Turbocharged engine however. You can't really use that as an excuse when Americans use SuperChargers.

    One last thing. If you folks REALLY like hp/liter, you may want to check out the 2000 Toyota Ultimate Celica Concept. It pumps 500 AWD HP from a 2 liter I-4 with TurboCharger. Do the math 500/2 = 250 hp per liter with turbo.
     
  8. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    It is not so amazing now that a car company can get 100hp per litre. Just remember that Honda was the first to do it reliably with an N/A engine. getting 100hp+ per litre from a turbo charged engine is really no big deal, the Mitsi VR4 had 100hp per litre in 1989 the same time the Honda b16a was put on the market.

    However Honda does push the limits as far as reliability goes with N/A motors. The last time I looked the S2000 was making 120hp per litre, that engine is now 3 years old and is still considered by many as the best 4 cyl on the market.
     
  9. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    You should be proud! They are the best at somthing that does absolutley nothing for preformance.

    This car and its stats are still entierly conceptual, ill believe it when i see it in production.
     
  10. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    Well, higher hp/l saves u money, engien is lighter = better weight disturbution, and higher rev.

    The stats are true, and Honda is going to put this kind of powerplant into the new NSX and/or the Honda Legend.
     
  11. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    Hp/L Saves you money? Where? In Japan where you have to pay taxes according to your engine size. Wow, great it will save you money in one of the world’s automotive markets, its practical there but not everywhere. It could help with gas mileage but isn’t necessary. The Corvette gets 28mpg highway, similar to the "all mighty" 120hp/Liter S2000.

    Lighter engines can help with weight distribution but again isn’t necessary to have a well balanced car. Many cars have relatively large engines and have excellent balance. (EX: Corvette, M5)

    Most importantly Hp/L DOES NOT create higher revs. Honda engines can rev high because they are small and well balanced. It is mechanically easier to move small engine components faster. (Although a NASCAR Pushrod 5.7L V8 can hit 11,000rpms) The Toyota Supra Turbo makes 106hp/L, I know it’s not naturally aspirated but because it has high hp/L doesn’t give it the sudden ability to rev higher. (It has an average, 6800rpm redline) The ability to rev high isn’t an advantage over any other means of gaining hp.

    I haven’t read anything saying this car isn’t going into production (whether it be this or the NSX with its engine) and I’m sure you read more about Honda’s than I do so ill take your word for it.
     
  12. #12 Honda rulez, Oct 23, 2002
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    Not only in Japan, but many Asian and European countries.

    "The differences between our cars and European cars mean that you either must make too many compromises or must offer variations that will raise production costs. Car taxes are much higher in Europe and are based on cylinder displacement. Europe's high gasoline taxes are another problem. Even Corvette doesn't sell in Europe." Quoted from:

    http://www.forbes.com/home/2002/08/26/0826flint.html

    The Corvette and M5 are both great cars, that's why they have great balance. But still, they are both FR cars, they don't have the the superior steering response as MR cars. That's becuz FR cars have higher polar moment of inertia, while MR cars have lower.

    I agree that hp/l doesn't create high rev, it's just that it's easier to create engines with higher hp/l with small displacement, and smaller engines mean easier to create high rev. Only having high rev is not ebough, u also need that torque at that high rpm, and this is wut most Hondas have - torque at high rpm. Honda creates engines that work simliar to a forumla one race car's engine. Which is high rev, not a lot of torque. When u have torque at high rpm, ur car has a lot of hp. Like u said, even NASCARs have high revving engines.
     
  13. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    Why did you bring up Mid engine vs. FR platforms, the discussion was about engine weight affecting balance, not engine location. (no doubt the MR is going to have an advantage)
     
  14. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    Last post u said something about the balance of a car, so I posted something about MR and FR.
     
  15. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    I don't get how you people can brag about the 120 hp per liter for a Honda S 2000, when the Mazda RX 8 gets 190 hp per liter.
     
  16. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    Different laws of Physics apply here, with rotaries, because of the way they function, a 1.3 litre is the equivalent of a 2.6 litre. So it's really inaccurate to use a rotary as an example. It's not like it's some spectacular feat of engineering. It's just the platform of engine design.
     
  17. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    "Lighter engines can help with weight distribution but again isn’t necessary to have a well balanced car. Many cars have relatively large engines and have excellent balance. (EX: Corvette, M5)"
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    i have no idea what you mean by that. you say weight distribution isnt nessesary to have a well balanced car. then you use the M5 as an example, which has near perfect 50/50 weight distribution.
     
  18. Re: ++ hp per litre ONLY HONDA

    No he didn't, he said that while lighter engines can HELP with weight distribution, lighter engines aren't necessary to have a well balanced car. He's referring to a well balanced car as one with good weight distribution.

    He then went on to say that many cars with large engines can still be well balanced, using the Corvette and M5 as examples, both of which are cars with large engines, and have a near 50/50 weight ratio. Though in the Corvette's case, weight was simply added to each end rather than having most of the weight closer to the middle, and therefore it is not truly well balanced, as that weight on the ends will transfer weight much more than if it were in the middle.
     

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