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Discussion in '1999 Leblanc Caroline' started by TASwim05, Aug 10, 2002.

  1. how the heck does this thing go so fast with only a 4-cylinder engine? I mean, I realize that it has 2 turbos, but I can't believe it's that fast, both in acceleration and top speed....<!-- Signature -->
     
  2. Re: No Subject

    well get used to it it has been this way for quite a while basically there is no need to have engines besides a flat 4, inline4, flat 6 and inline 6 anything bove that is overkill and there is really no reason in having them around.
     
  3. Re: No Subject

    That´s true a light chasis and a turbo make a 4 cylinder car go FAST!!!
     
  4. Re: No Subject

    Well I am a small engine fan, but you need cars with more cylinders than just 4 or 6, if you are running extremely high rpm's. That is why F1 cars use a V10, even if it is only a 3L. They need all the cylinders to be able to get the gas in the cylinders.

    I am going to try and explain this as best I can, and if you have questions ask them and I will try and explain.

    Well a 3L V6 has bigger cylinders than a 3L V10. So for the V6 to get as much gas as that V10 it has to put more gas in one cylinder than the V10 does, but the V10 will put in the same amount of gas because there are more cylinders. At high enough rpm's a V6 can be impossible to get as much gas in as a V10. But F1 cars run a red line of between 16,000 and 28,000 rpm's. Not what a normal car will run, or a Long distance car either.

    Hope that helps, so small engines are good, but not always low cylinder numbers.
     
  5. Re: No Subject

    "Well I am a small engine fan, but you need cars with more cylinders than just 4 or 6, if you are running extremely high rpm's. That is why F1 cars use a V10, even if it is only a 3L. They need all the cylinders to be able to get the gas in the cylinders."

    Contrary to what you seem to think F1 cars do not use v10's because they run the engines at extremely high rpms, F1 cars in fact use V10 enignes because that is one of the rules in F1 racing that they abide by.



    "Well a 3L V6 has bigger cylinders than a 3L V10. So for the V6 to get as much gas as that V10 it has to put more gas in one cylinder than the V10 does, but the V10 will put in the same amount of gas because there are more cylinders. At high enough rpm's a V6 can be impossible to get as much gas in as a V10. But F1 cars run a red line of between 16,000 and 28,000 rpm's. Not what a normal car will run, or a Long distance car either.

    Hope that helps, so small engines are good, but not always low cylinder numbers."


    I suppose thats why the Honda s2000 rev limiter kicks in at 9,000 rpm huh? lol Also current F1 engines rev at 17,500 rpm and beyond.
     
  6. Re: No Subject

    It does not say that you can have only a v10 in a F1 car. here are the rules, they are for the 2001 season, but that is still resent.

    ARTICLE 5: ENGINE
    5.1 Engine specification:
    5.1.1 Only 4-stroke engines with reciprocating pistons are permitted.
    5.1.2 Engine capacity must not exceed 3000 cc.
    5.1.3 Supercharging is forbidden.
    5.1.4 The maximum number of cylinders is 12 and the normal section of each cylinder must be circular.
    5.1.5 Engines may have no more than 5 valves per cylinder.

    5.2 Other means of propulsion:
    5.2.1 The use of any device, other than the 3 litre, four stroke engine described in 5.1 above, to power the car, is not permitted.
    5.2.2 The total amount of recoverable energy stored on the car must not exceed 300kJ, any which may be recovered at a rate greater than 2kW must not exceed 20kJ.

    5.3 Temperature and pressure of the charge:
    5.3.1 Any device, system, procedure, construction or design the purpose and/or effect of which is any decrease whatsoever of the temperature of the intake air and/or of the charge (air and/or fuel) of the engine is forbidden.
    5.3.2 Internal and/or external spraying of water or any substance whatsoever is forbidden (other than fuel for the normal purpose of combustion in the engine).

    5.4 Exhaust system:
    Variable geometric length exhaust systems are forbidden.

    5.5 Engine materials:
    5.5.1 The basic structure of the crankshaft and camshafts must be made from steel or cast iron.
    5.5.2 Pistons, cylinder heads and cylinder blocks may not be composite structures which use carbon or aramid fibre reinforcing materials.

    5.6 Starting the engine:
    A supplementary device temporarily connected to the car may be used to start the engine both on the grid and in the pits.

    5.7 Throttle control:
    5.7.1 Other than the specific exceptions mentioned below in 5.7.2, there must be a fixed relationship between the position of the throttle pedal and the engine throttles. This relationship need not be linear but the position of the engine throttles may not be influenced by anything other than movement of the throttle pedal when operated by the driver.
    This relationship must remain fixed whilst the car is in motion subject only to Article 8.3.
    5.7.2 The relationship between the throttle pedal and engine throttles may alter during one or more of the following operations:
    idle control;
    stall prevention;
    gear changing;
    car speed limiting.


    5.8 Engine control:
    Ignition and fuel settings must maintain the same relationship with engine speed and throttle position whilst the car is in motion, with the following specific exceptions:
    compensation for throttle acceleration;
    driver adjustable fuel mixture control with a maximum of three settings;
    compensation for changes in engine intake air temperature and pressure, engine pressures or engine temperatures;
    open or closed loop detonation and lambda control.
    No engine parameter may be altered so as to diminish the degree of control the driver has over the propulsion system.

    5.9 Stall prevention systems:
    5.9.1 Each time such a system is activated it must remain so until the driver de-activates it by manually operating the clutch.
    5.9.2 To avoid the possibility of a car involved in an accident being left with the engine running, all such systems must be configured to stop the engine no more than ten seconds after activation.

    5.10 Engine rev limiters:
    With the exception of the car speed limiter below and subject to Article 8.3, engine rev limits may vary for differing conditions provided all are significantly above the peak of the engine power curve.

    5.11 Car speed limiter:
    5.11.1 The purpose of the speed limiter is to improve safety by ensuring a driver is less likely to exceed the pit lane speed limit.
    5.11.2 The car speed limiter may be operated only by the driver when he needs it and must be de-activated by him at the time it is no longer required.
    5.11.3 Car speed limiters may only operate in first, second and third gears and may only be activated in the pit lane.


    As for the lower rpm's than what they are running, that was for the older f1 cars. and 9,000rpm's isn't that many. I am working on builting an engine right now that should get around 52,000-54,000rpm's. With a few new things on it that are penting patents. I don't know if it will work yet or not for it is in the concept design state right now.
     
  7. Re: No Subject

    The thing that caught my eye was the breaklights. im in love with skylines and they reminded me of them with the big circle and small circle. I think that this car looks like it can go that fast.
     
  8. Re: No Subject

    Kind of like the porshe
     

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