Which country has the best cuisine?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Baklava, Jun 6, 2016.

?

Best cuisine?

  1. Italian

    15.4%
  2. French

    7.7%
  3. British

    3.8%
  4. Thai

    7.7%
  5. Indonesian

    3.8%
  6. Vietnamese

    7.7%
  7. Chinese

    11.5%
  8. Mexican

    15.4%
  9. Argentinian

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  10. Other

    26.9%
  1. Well make one. You drink like a Cali housewife anyway.

    I tried to provoke Wheelman earlier but he didn't bite. If I make a thread about American wine now, it will be too obvious.
     
    ETB4U likes this.
  2. Countries don't have 'the best food' anymore. It depends on the restaurant owner. You go anywhere and you find cheap food that will make you hurl.

    That said, I was impressed with Seoul Korea. When I was there, I saw them take something as simple as KFC, and turn it into a dozen different flavours, but offer craft beer too.... This is what KFC should be.

    I don't even like Fried Chicken, but it was amazing.
     
    yh125d likes this.
  3. I believe you about KFC in Korea, but I have to ask. If you were in Korea, why the **** would you have gone to KFC in the first place?
     
    SEABEE likes this.
  4. I didn't go to KFC, I went to their 'college town' Craft Beer and Fried Chicken place. I actually ate a lot of various food there, but man, they took American Culture and made it even better... the way it should be.
     
  5. There are so many (delicious) foods that are ubiquitous in China but relatively unknown in the West. Like these Baozi and Zongzi I made this week:



    IMG_3783.JPG IMG_1988.JPG


    Like pirozhki or falafel they are a lot of work but totally worth it.
     
    Tree Fitty likes this.
  6. That looks really good
     
  7. Thx. I tried making some Indonesian peanut soss with grilled chicken. Turned out delicious but it looked like baby diarrhea so I didn't take a picture.
     
    Baklava likes this.
  8. I presume that Indonesia also has lots of vendors with food carts or small stands around. In Yurops it's hard to find places that specialize in a single dish or a single type of dish. Hard to beat someone who has been making one thing for decades.

    Example: if hot dogs were a Chinese food, a typical hot dog place would include a guy who's making the hot dog sausages from scratch, some old lady who's kneading dough for the buns, someone who's steaming them, someone who's cutting vegetables to be marinated, etc.

    Hard to find that kind of effort and attention to detail given to food in the West these days, especially outside the fanciest restaurants.
     
  9. #59 CitroenSM, Jun 18, 2016
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2016
    Vietnamese
     
  10. Союз Советских Социалистических Республик

    ССС ****ing Р

    [​IMG]
     
  11. True. I really like the street vendor culture in Asia. It's a shame we don't have that here.
     
  12. Russia has only vodka. Its not even that great. Canada has better Vodka. We use filters to keep out the piss.
     
  13. Yea I really need that thumbs down option

    "France has only baguettes. They aren't even that great. Canada has better baguettes. We use maple syrup to keep out the surrender"
     
    SEABEE and Walperstyle like this.
  14. Italian food is the best

    Yes, I'm biased

    No, Olive Garden is not Italian
     
  15. #65 DIGGS, Jun 19, 2016
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2016
    Fijian coconut curry crab. And/or curry goat. Pan fried curry chicken hearts. Fucking delicious.

    Good sushi. Which FYI for someone in this thread is Japanese. Not Chinese.


    But on a wide spectrum. I think traditional north American comfort foods are pretty damned good.
    BBQ. Steak and mashed potatoes. Burgers and fries. Jambalaya.
     
  16. bbq, steak, mashed potatoes, fries, jambalaya are very far from american.
     
  17. #67 DIGGS, Jun 19, 2016
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2016
    If you want to get technical, Bbq was created by the Spanish when they landed in the carribean. French fries are from belgium. Creole jambalaya is an American version of paella. And technicaly steak originated back when the first caveman slapped a piece of meat over a fire.
    But they are very much considered north American comfort foods. Considering North America is a melting pot of many nations and originated from European countries it's not really a surprise that the foods commonly considered "American food" have origins from other places.
    Don't be so pedantic.
     
  18. Notsureiftroll
     
  19. I'm not being pedantic. Lots of cultures here as well with a lot of dishes. Doesn't make those dishes Dutch, because we eat it a lot.
     
  20. You are being pedantic. And if you want to be really pedantic. It all originated from that same cave man who threw meat on fire.
    So quit arguing for the sake of arguing.
     
  21. Pretty sure that Jambalaya is a very distinctive Louisiana dish. All of those other things sound quite American to me as well.

    Swedes weren't the first people to make meatballs but nobody sane would suggest that Swedish meatballs aren't Swedish. Or that espresso and arancini wouldn't be Italian. Or paella Spanish. Neither Italian or Spanish cuisine would exist in their current form without the huuge Arab influence. Or Americas, for that matter.

    Arabs brought with them: coffee, all citrus fruit, rice, spices, eggplants, tea, a shitload of vegetables, etc. As well as cooking techniques. It's not that hard to draw a connection between paella and pilaf, for example.

    The potato, all capsicum variants, all gourds and pumpkins, cocoa, avocado, tomato, corn, tobacco, etc. are from Americas... the list goes on forever.

    Today we think of Indian, Sichuan or Thai food and we immediately associate them with chili peppers. Funny thing is that chili peppers were brought to these areas not that long ago, mostly by association of European traders. And yet civilizations have existed in India, China and Thailand long before the dawn of the Roman Empire. Food was vastly different back then.

    Truth is, the average European diet was pretty austere before the Renaissance (and in parts of Northern Europe remains like that to this day). The majority of ingredients we take for granted today, our ancestors didn't have back then. The description used by Big Rob, "boiled dirt", isn't that far off.

    Your turn.
     
  22. Says the person who corrected me about sushi.
     
  23. Heh heh I was waiting for you to say that.
     
  24. LOL yeah. Pizza which is a staple of Italian cuisine wouldn't exist without American tomatoes and Arabian flat bread
     

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