A little history:

Discussion in '1969 Datsun 240Z' started by beastly1155, Aug 9, 2002.

  1. Re: A little history:

    wasup<!-- Signature -->
     
  2. There is a reason that Datsun had these great Z-cars back in the day when in contrast all the other Japanese companies were chugging out tiny little box-type worthless things.

    After WW2, every sector of Japanese industry was wiped out by the bombs. The United Nations, not wanting to make the same mistake they did in 1918 with Germany, decided to rebuild the Japanese economy. Datsun was founded by Austin Healy, a British company. The reason that Datsun was kicking out these terrific little sports cars was because they were not a Japanese company after all. They didn't officialy become a Japanese owned company until they were bought out and the name changed to Nissan in the early 1980's.<!-- Signature -->
     
  3. Re: A little history:

    wrong.
     
  4. Re: A little history:

    Erm yeah sorry but that is utter BS
     
  5. Re: A little history:

    if you dont have proff its BS dont bother posting
     
  6. Re: A little history:

    THEY ARE AND WHERE I WELL BUILT CAR WORKED ON THEM WHEN THEY WHERE NEW DOING MACHANICAL PROBLEMS EMPACT REPAIRS TO CARS BODYS DID NOT LIKE THE UNIBODY- FIRST CAR TO USE THE UNIBODY DROVE A COUPLE -BUT I OWNED 4 DATSUN ROADSTERS ROADSTER HAD A FRAME - I GREW UP IN A DATSUN COVERTABLE - STILL HAVE PARTS BUT THE CARS ARE ALL GONE
     
  7. #7 badspy, Jan 15, 2004
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    Re: A little history:

    Yeah, that history is untrue. Datsun started out in 1911, in the early 1930s it was later sold, then split off as an indipendant company under a different name. The holding company that privided funding was known as "Ni-San" which, were apparently the stock-echange characters. In the mid-1930s it became known as the Nissan Motor Company Ltd. Nissan used the Datsun name for cars and trucks, and Nissan for comercial vehicles, IIRC.

    HOWEVER. after the war, the company (as well as others) became under the control of US authorities; then handed back in the mid-50s. Austin agreed to help get Nissan back on their feet by commissioning them do build some cars, the Austin A40 was one. The Datsun Bluebird shares a bit of the look of one of the Austin cars they assembled, but the Z was Datsun's own. Thats the only way I can think of you getting that history from.

    edit:

    Just googled a link, that is more comprehensive, and mostlikely more accurate: http://www.ratdat.com/history/history.html
     
  8. Re: A little history:

    That last post was right, the first one was way off, but easily confused if you only read the history from postwar on. The company name was actually Nissan at the time the 240z was being produced in America but the company heads where afraid that name sounded to Japanese for it to appeal to the American market, so they branded it Datsun, for the foreign market. Hense the Datsun stickers and badges, and the Nissan owners manual. I own two z's, I hope I will alwayse own one or more, the 350z is the only other z that compares to the original 240z in price, performance, and originality.

     

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