how many fast?

Discussion in '2009 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1' started by Jew Jew Rocket, Dec 26, 2007.

  1. #26 mpg, Jan 8, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    Here's the link that I was looking for.

    http://forums.corvetteforum.com/showthread.php?t=1876797
     
  2. It being a ZR-1, you're probably right. That being said...how often do they make sense with cars nowadays? GM for one, with their finacial struggles, will probably offer this is in ways just to make the extra money NOT only with promised performance, but also just for those they can snag with dumb options like offering a convertible top for a car like this. That's market shit for ya...

    BTW, does anyone know if they decided what to call the Corvette with the LS3 yet, or am I asking a really, really dumb question?
     
  3. The LS2 is history. The LS3 is now the only engine in the base Corvette, therefore there's no reason to call it anything other than "Corvette".
     
  4. all i know is that this car is gonna be hella fast and that's good enough for me
     
  5. it will probably have like 10 acceleration but maybe only 6 handling. like 8 drifting though.

    edit: and 1 interior
     
  6. I lol at this entire thread. A bunch of people I've never heard of being messed with by some of the oldest members. #$%#ing classic.
     
  7. #32 Dragonspirit, Jun 13, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    Thank you for the link man just simply awesome to see it do a 10.981 sec. @ 128.90 mph, ON STREET TIERS!!!<A BORDER="0" HREF="http://www.supercars.net/PitLane?displayFAQ=y"><IMG BORDER="0" SRC="pitlane/emoticons/grin.gif"></A> And a 10.830 sec. @ 130 mph, ON DRAG RADIALS!!!<A BORDER="0" HREF="http://www.supercars.net/PitLane?displayFAQ=y"><IMG BORDER="0" SRC="pitlane/emoticons/cool.gif"></A> Pure joy of speed at it's finest!
     
  8. Don't be surprised if the '09 ZR1 does a 10 sec. flat quarter or less ON STREET TIRES!!!<A BORDER="0" HREF="http://www.supercars.net/PitLane?displayFAQ=y"><IMG BORDER="0" SRC="pitlane/emoticons/smile.gif"></A> Driven by of course a professional drag racer, though.
     
  9. I like the blue paint
     
  10. we need more info about the cars here such as price and aceleration some times the website feels cheap
     
  11. I would look up the specs and doublecheck them before I quote them.
     
  12. ya i think fastest 2
     
  13. Gues 330 km/h per hours.By the way,my name is Jojomix and i'm glad to be a memeber of this site.I'm 10 and i go to 4th grade so i use my dad's E-Mail adress.
     
  14. Welcome on board. Don't use the report thread function unless you want to flag an action that's against the forum rules, please. Enjoy your stay.
     
  15. #41 Veyronman, Feb 18, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    hello

    post in general chat. it's more fun

    http://www.supercars.net/PitLane?viewForum=y&gID=4&fID=0
     
  16. feels cheap? feels shit i'd say
     
  17. This is a fantastic post.
     
  18. Well here's from wikipedia.com, as to the '09 ZR1s price and performance numbers....I hope you all enjoy:



    '09 Corvette C6 ZR1 specs:
    * Displacement: V8 6.2 L (378.3 cu in) w/ (Eaton) TVS Supercharger & Intercooler.
    * Horsepower: 638 bhp (476 kW) at 6500 rpm
    * Torque: 604 ft·lbs (819 N·m)
    * Bore: 103.25 mm (4.065 in)
    * Stroke: 92.0 mm (3.62 in)
    * Compression: 9.9:1
    * Supercharger maximum boost: 10.5 psi (0.7 bar)
    * Redline: 6600 rpm
    * Clutch: 260 mm (10 in)
    * Final Drive Ratio: 3.42
    * 1st gear ratio: 2.29
    * 1st gear top speed: 106 km/h (66 mph)
    * 2nd gear top speed: 155 km/h (96 mph)
    * 3rd gear top speed: 210 km/h (130 mph)
    * 6th gear ratio: 0.67
    * Wheel size front: 19 in (480 mm) diameter by 10 in (250 mm) width
    * Wheel size rear: 20 in (510 mm) diameter by 12 in (300 mm) width
    * Tire size front: 285/30R-19
    * Tire size rear: 335/25R-20
    * Brakes front: Brembo 15.5 in (390 mm)
    * Brakes rear: Brembo 15.0 in (380 mm)
    * As a result the ZR1 will stop from 60 mph in a current production car record breaking 96 feet.
    * Front/rear balance: 52/48
    * Curb weight: estimated 3,352 lb (1,520 kg)
    * 0-60 mph (97 km/h): 3.3[3]
    * Top speed:205 mph (330 km/h)[4]
    * Quarter mile (~400 m) time: 11.2[3]
    * Quarter mile speed: 135 mph (217 km/h)
    * Production: 2000 units per year (estimated)
    * Lateral acceleration: 1.10 g (average) [3]



    As far as price its going to be from, $106,620 to $113,970USD. Oh...as to the brake rotors, the fronts where originally designed for the Ferrari FXX, while the rears where specificially designed for the Ferrari Enzo...OH...BTW!
     
  19. #45 Dragonspirit, Jan 24, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    Well here's from www.wikipedia.com, with lap times from Nurburgring (Nordschliefe) road course. Enjoy, yo!



    Nordschliefe lap times from #1-23:


    1. '09 Radical SR8LM 6:48.0sec.

    2. '05 Radical SR8 6:55.0sec.

    3. '09 Gumpert Apollo Sport 7:11.5sec.

    4. '06 Donkervoort D8 370 RS 7:14.89sec.

    5. '04 Donkervoort D8 370 7:18.01sec.

    6. '08 Dodge Viper SRT-10 ACR 7:22.1sec.

    7. '08 Maserati MC12 7:24.29sec.

    8. '08 Pagani Zonda F Clubsport 7:24.7sec.

    9. '08 Ferrari Enzo 7:25.3sec.

    10. '08 Chevrolet Corvette C6 ZR1 7:26.4sec.

    11. '09 Nissan GTR 7:26.70sec.

    12. '04 Porsche Carrera GT 7:28.71sec.

    13. '07 Porsche 911 GT2 7:32.02sec.

    14. '08 Koenigsegg CCX 7:33.6sec.

    15. '06 Koenigsegg CCR 7:34.0sec.

    16. '08 Ruf Rt 12 7:34.5sec.

    17. '08 Porsche 911 Turbo 7:38.5sec.

    18. '10 Porsche 911 Turbo(2010) 7:39.0sec.

    19. '08 Ferrari F430 Scuderia 7:39.5sec.

    20. '07 Lamborghini Murcielago LP640 7:40.0sec.

    21. '05 Bugatti Veyron 16/4 7:40.2sec.

    22. '04 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren 7:40.3sec.

    23. '09 Porsche 911 GT3 997MkII 7:40.5sec.



    Oh, the dates are of when they were tested. So, the point here is it seems that the C6 ZR1 can hold its own against, the Ferrari F430 Scuderia and Porsche 997MkII 911 GT3 around a track after all. Also, here's where there located at on www.wikipedia.com; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N%C3%BCrburgring_lap_times.
     
  20. @@@
    The Basques, a distinct ethnic group spread across current-day Spain and France, provided a small but distinct genetic contribution to current-day Continental South American populations, including the Maya in Mexico
    Meanwhile, the Caribbean Islands of Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic are genetically similar to each other and distinct from the other populations


    The left image shows how much European ancestry is in the Americas, while the left image relates to American ancestry. The bars are colour coded to match the map above. 聽The Basques (light), a distinct ethnic group spread across current-day Spain and France, provided a small but distinct genetic contribution to current-day Continental South American populations, including the Maya in Mexic

    The Oxford team first grouped subsets of people in Africa and Europe who were genetically similar. IThey were able to separate European genomes into 37 groups (pictured). They then compared the data with the genomes from 2,500 American people of mixed ancestr


    The ancestors of current-day Yoruba people (left) from West Africa - which is one of the largest African ethnic groups - provided the largest contribution of genes from Africa to all current-day American populations. The most common European genetic source in African-Americans and Barbadians comes from the UK (right
    US ANCESTRY: KEY FINDINGS - The most common European genetic source in African-Americans and Barbadians comes from the UK
    - The Basques, a distinct ethnic group spread across Spain and France, provided a small but distinct genetic contribution to current-day Continental South American populations
    - Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic are genetically similar to each other and distinct from the other populations, probably reflecting a different migration pattern between the Caribbean and mainland America
    - Compared to South Americans, people from Caribbean countries (such as the Barbados) had a larger genetic contribution from Africa
    - The ancestors of current-day Yoruba people from West Africa provided the largest contribution of genes from Africa to all current-day American populations
    - The proportion of African ancestry varied across the continent, from virtually zero in the Maya people from Mexico to 87 per cent in current-day Barbados
    - South Italy and Sicily provided a European contribution to Colombia and Puerto Rico, in line with the history of Italian emigrants to the Americas in the 19th and early 20th century
    - One of the African-American groups from the USA had French ancestry, which reflects historical French immigration into the colonial Southern US
    The researchers say this probably reflects a different migration pattern between the Caribbean and mainland America
    Compared to South Americans, people from Caribbean countries, such as the Barbados, had a larger genetic contribution from Africa
    The ancestors of current-day Yoruba people from West Africa - which is one of the largest African ethnic groups - provided the largest contribution of genes from Africa to all current-day American populations
    'We can see the huge genetic impact that the slave trade had on American populations and our data match historical records', said study author Dr Garrett Hellenthal from the UCL Genetics Institute
    'The majority of African Americans have ancestry similar to the Yoruba people in West Africa, confirming that most African slaves came from this region
    鈥業n areas of the Americas historically under Spanish rule, populations also have ancestry related to what is now Senegal and Gambia. Records show that around a third of the slaves sent to Spanish America in the 17th Century came from this region, and we can see the genetic evidence of this in modern Americans really clearly.
    Researchers also found that the proportion of African ancestry varied across the continent, from virtually zero in the Maya people from Mexico to 87 per cent in current-day Barbados
    South Italy and Sicily also provided a significant European genetic contribution to Colombia and Puerto Rico, in line with the known history of Italian emigrants to the Americas in the late 19th and early 20th centur
    One of the African-American groups from the USA had French ancestry, in agreement with historical French immigration into the colonial Southern United States
    The proportion of genes from European versus African sources varied greatly from individual to individual within recipient populations
    These genetic findings also uncover previously unknown migration. 'We found a clear genetic contribution from the Basques in modern-day Maya in Mexico', said Oxford University's Professor Cristian Capelli. 'This suggests that the Basque also took part in the colonisation of the Americas, coming over either with the Spanish conquistadores or in later waves of migration
    'The differences in European ancestry between the Caribbean islands and mainland American population that we found were also previously unknown
    鈥業t is likely that these differences reflect different patterns of migration between the Caribbean and mainland America
    'These results show just how powerful a genetic approach can be when it comes to uncovering hidden patterns of ancestry,鈥?added Professor Capelli
    The team now hopes to use the same approach to look at other populations with diverse genetic contributions, such as Brazilians

    Professor Capellii, who is Italian, was particularly suprised to find evidence of e Italians in Puerto Rico (bottom right), as well as the fact that some part of Spain, but not others, contributed Spanish DNA to the Americas. Pictured is a graph of some of the regions analysed in the study as well as how much DNA from around the world was found in the population

    South Italy and Sicily provided a significant European genetic contribution to Colombia and Puerto Rico, in line with the known history of Italian emigrants to the Americas in the late 19th and early 20th century

     

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