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Discussion in '2002 Ferrari Enzo' started by Homero, Aug 9, 2002.

  1. #251 Homero, Aug 9, 2002
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2016
    Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    NEW FERRARI ENZO PRESS PACK

    Why this car was named "Enzo Ferrari"?

    Maranello needed a hole brochure to explain it.

    “Il nome dell’auto, Il nome dell’uomo”
    (“The Name of the Car, The Name of the Man”)

    Click here (Adobe Acrobat required)

    http://netdial.caribe.net/~ernie/il_nome_dell_uomo.pdf
     
  2. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    “4CAR” ROAD TEST

    Ferrari's fastest road car - ever

    4CAR RATING *****

    A 217.5 mph top speed and a 0-62 mph sprint time of 3.65 seconds make the strangely-labelled Enzo Ferrari the fastest road car the company has ever produced. Named after the company's founder, who died in 1988, it's the fourth in a series of limited edition Ferraris that began with the 288 GTO of 1984, followed by the F40 of 1987 and the F50 of 1995. This mid-engined, carbonfibre, V12-powered, two-seater supercar will cost "not less than £420,000", says Ferrari, which intends making just 349 copies. The Enzo owes much to Formula One technology in its make-up, from its carbonfibre construction to the F1 sequential-shift transmission and a massive set of carbon-ceramic brake discs. Despite offering a staggering 660 bhp, Ferrari claims that the Enzo is easy to drive, the aim being to offer drivers less skilled than Michael Schumacher the chance to experience a little of what the great man deals with on a Sunday afternoon. And he should know, because he helped develop the Enzo. Though he reckons it's still not close to a F1 experience, this car will bring you nearer to it than any other road car, he says. So while the legendary McLaren F1 may have a higher top speed and is perhaps more stringently engineered, the Enzo is reckoned to be easier to drive fast and hard. And it's cheaper, too.
    No version or price information available.

    SUMMARY:
    For: Predatory looks, alien-dimension performance, easy to drive (relatively), lovingly constructed.... and a brain-blowing experience
    Against: Predatory looks, impractically wide, a trifle pricey, small numbers mean you're unlikely to see one
    Sum-up: Probably the last word in boy's toys - for now

    Reliability and Quality ****

    You can, if you're picky, find things wrong with this car. Stare hard at the paint, and you'll see the faint rectangular grid-pattern of the carbonfibre beneath. Try winding the manual window winders and you'll struggle with the effort - and on the early car we tried, the winder fouled the door trim. But the Enzo is hand-made, in tiny numbers by Toyota standards, and it's fair to argue that this is part of its appeal. And generally, it is extremely well presented. It's built for lightness, but the odd oasis of leather and the beautifully finished bare carbonfibre of the cabin instantly mark it out as an object exquisitely produced. Reliability? Ferraris are vastly better made than they once were, but it would be a surprise if this extreme machine didn't suffer the odd glitch.

    Image ****

    You need to be extrovert to own this car, or oblivious to stares, or have your own private road and track - actually a possibility, among the Enzo's likely clientele. Reactions to this car will vary from outright lust and admiration to venomous resentment, as with any supercar owned in Britain. Ferrari's reputation is flying high at the moment with all those F1 achievements, but there are plenty who think that owning one of its road cars is extremely naff, no matter how good it might be to drive.

    Performance *****

    You couldn't want for more, with a 217.5 mph top speed and a 0-62 mph sprint time of under 3.7 seconds. Could you? Well no, but we did notice that if you take second gear, say, and floor the throttle at 1500 rpm, the power takes a little time to build. Of course, we're talking relatively - the Enzo is a rapid mover at any engine speed - but it's past 4000 rpm that most of the action happens. That's when the revs rip toward the 8200 rpm red line and the engine turns wrenchingly powerful, its bellow rising to a yell and the Enzo convulsing with the effort of delivering so much energy to the road. And when it comes, you'd better be ready, because you'll have felt, and heard, nothing like it.

    Ease of Driving ****

    This, believe it or not, was a major Ferrari goal for the Enzo - perhaps not so surprising considering that there are 660 bhp to dispense. In traffic, for instance, it will be a minor challenge to avoid ramming the car in front, a mere twitch of the foot easily unleashing a hundred horsepower. Mastering the sequential shift is fairly simple, but effecting smooth gearchanges is not, although it's easier in Sport mode, below 6000 rpm. But the violence of the Enzo's progress is part of its appeal - it more than hints at the explosiveness of Formula One performance. For Britain, the Enzo's biggest drawback is that it will be left-hand drive only, which will make its considerable width still more intimidating. Even so, it is easier to steer than many supercars - visibility is pretty good, reversing is not a total nightmare and the controls relatively easy to master. One potentially embarrassing feature - the horn buttons nestle in the wheel rim, where it's too easy to touch them. And the horn is loud.

    Safety and Security ****

    You get twin front airbags, but there are no side or headbags. However, the Enzo's immensely strong structure is designed to withstand a 37 mph head-on crash and a 40 mph offset impact, to comply with regulations not yet in force. The potent anti-lock brakes and the traction control system provide a considerable safety net, but this car must always be driven with care. And parked intelligently - thief-proofing is limited, but then few owners are going to leave an Enzo on the street.

    Roominess ***

    It's a strict two-seater, and of necessity, the leather bucket seats clench you tight, but the Enzo's cockpit is fairly roomy. Getting in is fairly simple, despite the wide sill, because the doors open wide and cut well into the roof, but getting out requires technique if you're to depart with dignity. The boot, located up front, won't take much more than a squashable weekend bag - all you need for an adventure, mind - but there are more cabin storage cubbies than you'd expect in such a wilfully impractical car.

    Running Costs **

    It will help if you can find the £420,000 in cash of course, because you'll need a mortgage to buy the Enzo otherwise. Still, depreciation should be low compared to the average car, but only in percentage terms - even a 10 percent drop is the price of a BMW M3... Maintenance costs won't be slight, but the Enzo shouldn't need significantly more attention than a standard Ferrari. Be prepared to spend thousands if you light up its bespoke Bridgestone Scuderia tyres too often, though.

    Comfort ****

    It may not have a stereo, but the Enzo does have air conditioning. The beautiful leather-skinned carbonfibre seats will be selected to suit the owner's girth, while both the seat and the pedals are adjustable. We found the driving position excellent even without personal tailoring. Though prominent - and you wouldn't want it any other way - the engine is not over-insistent, and on the track we drove it on, the Enzo rode fine. But gearchanges can be gut-twistingly savage, especially past 6000 rpm, when the shifts are super-quick. This, though is part of the thrill. On the road we suspect a very firm but tolerable ride, quite a bit of tyre noise and minimal rattles and squeaks from the super-strong structure.

    Fun to Drive *****

    How could it not be fun with 660 bhp? Quite easily actually, because the power delivery might be terrifyingly unmanageable - getting that right was one of Ferrari's biggest challenges. But the engine's manners, the sequential gearshift - probably easier to use than a manual shift on a car this powerful, because you need to swap cogs so fast - and the sophisticated traction control make it easy to enjoy at least some of its earth-shrinking performance. Your biggest difficulty will be finding space. With so much power it's not difficult to exercise the traction control system, which, happily, intervenes without those frustrating, motion-stalling jerks that afflict lesser systems. Turning the ASR off soon reminds you why it's better to leave it on, too - tramping the throttle will soon have the Enzo's tail arcing like a cracked whip. It's possible to travel mighty fast and in considerable safety, especially since those huge carbon brakes will slow the Enzo with stomach-crushing authority. Sensibly, they come with ABS, too. The steering is a delight too - not heavy, like the McLaren F1's, quick-acting but not nervous, and full of feel. So yes, you can have huge fun in this car. You don't have to be especially skilled to enjoy it and if you are, turn off the traction control - a choice best indulged on a track - and learn to master the brute force of a monster.

    Stereo/Sat Nav *

    Actually there is no stereo, nor satellite navigation, Ferrari figuring that the engine is your soundtrack (a mighty fine one too) and that you ought to know where you're going. And not having them saves weight, which is the enemy of performance. So, a single star for having the nerve to leave them out.

    Value for Money ***

    Strange to consider, when it costs at least £420,000, but even for the super-rich value is usually an issue. This is the most expensive road-going Ferrari yet - it's a good £70,000 more than the F50 - although it's usefully less than the 231 mph £532,500 McLaren F1 of the mid '90s. The VW Group threatens to offer its 1001 bhp V16 Bugatti Veyron for similar money when it finally arrives, making the Enzo look a little less keenly-priced. But the Ferrari heritage, and legions of prancing horse collectors, are likely to ensure that this car depreciates little, if at all. And the £420,000 certainly buys you a lot of contemporary race-car technology.

    Used ***

    If you want one, it'll be hard to find it used - machines of this calibre tend to change hands through an elite global used car network. But most, if not all, Enzos will have been immaculately kept, many wastefully collecting dust in the high security garages of the planet's best addresses, having been bought as objects to admire rather than drive. Ferrari's back-up system will ensure that you can always keep your Enzo on the road, even when it's a classic - but it will cost.
     
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  4. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    NEW PICTURES

    A camouflaged Enzo smoking tires and the AutoWeek test.
     
  5. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    NEW PICTURES (I)

    A camouflaged Enzo smoking tires.
     
  6. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    NEW PICTURES (II)

    From the AutoWeek test.
     
  7. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    NEW PICTURES (II)

    From the AutoWeek test.
     
  8. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    Im not sure if everyone saw this picture but its a POTD
    and its an Enzo<!-- Signature -->
     
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  14. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    Funny :) !!
     
  15. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    I hate to think that they will spend their lives rotting in the dusty million square foot garages of playboys and corrupt executives.
     
  16. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    MORE PICTURES FROM AUTOBILD MAGAZINE (I)
     
  17. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    MORE PICTURES FROM AUTOBILD MAGAZINE (and II)

     
  18. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    damn u homero! u beat me! i was gonna post those! :(<!-- Signature -->
     
  19. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from StillTooSlow</i>
    <b>damn u homero! u beat me! i was gonna post those! :(</b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->

    "StillTooSlow". The perfect nikname for you... :)
     
  20. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    AUTO, MOTOR UND SPORT MAGAZINE

     
  21. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    AUTO, MOTOR UND SPORT MAGAZINE
     
  22. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    AUTO, MOTOR UND SPORT MAGAZINE
     
  23. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    **** it,
    there is a car that never ,really never will be beaten in prestige ,heritage and passion..
    Iz the most powerful and Žbeautiful car all over world...
    Iz just so strong and wonderful....
    Iz concept is incredible genius.....
    The car I'm talking about is the car I will always love......
    Listen to what I say.......
    *****The legandary Mc Laren F1*****
    Nothing else,
    the Enzo really is very beautiful...but there is another one........

    By the way..
    even the Königsegg can beat this car very easily...lol...
    Thanx°°°
    <!-- Signature -->
     
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  25. Re: FERRARI ENZO DAILY NEWS

    <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from LaMagra2002</i>
    <b>**** it,
    there is a car that never ,really never will be beaten in prestige ,heritage and passion..
    Iz the most powerful and Žbeautiful car all over world...
    Iz just so strong and wonderful....
    Iz concept is incredible genius.....
    The car I'm talking about is the car I will always love......
    Listen to what I say.......
    *****The legandary Mc Laren F1*****
    Nothing else,
    the Enzo really is very beautiful...but there is another one........

    By the way..
    even the Königsegg can beat this car very easily...lol...
    Thanx°°°
    </b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->

    Yeah, I'll take the Enzo any day over the McLaren.

    Angus<!-- Signature -->
     

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