shooting brake?

Discussion in '1936 Rolls-Royce 20/25' started by Sinister, Aug 9, 2002.


  1. Thats an odd name, could anyone explain to me why its called this..<!-- Signature -->
     
  2. Re: shooting brake?

    Shooting Brake is just British for wagon. <!-- Signature -->
     
  3. Re: shooting brake?

    What Joe said, it is basically British for a car with a wagon-like rear end.<!-- Signature -->
     
  4. Re: shooting brake?

    This is a odd name. 4-speed manual? This is the only time i've heard of a roller using a manual, though i wish they would implement it on thier new car.<!-- Signature -->
     
  5. Re: shooting brake?

    <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from EAGLEF1</i>
    <b>This is a odd name. 4-speed manual? This is the only time i've heard of a roller using a manual, though i wish they would implement it on thier new car.</b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->

    Yeah, it does seem unusual. But the reason for it is that back then, not too many cars had sutomatics at all, period. Besides that, people who had Rolls Royce's didn't really drive for themselves anyway.
     
  6. Re: shooting brake?

    Actually, no cars had a true automatic transmission in 1936, it hadn't been invented yet. There were plenty of tranny's that made shifting easier, but no that did it all by themselves until the 1941 Oldmobile debuted it.<!-- Signature -->
     
  7. Re: shooting brake?

    Shooting brake = Station wagon<!-- Signature -->
     
  8. Re: shooting brake?

    This is a nice woody I like it. I wish I had an old rolls like this that would be sweet.<!-- Signature -->
     
  9. Re: shooting brake?

    Does anyone know how much one of these would cost today<!-- Signature -->
     
  10. Re: shooting brake?

    <!-- QUOTE --><center><hr width="90%"></center><blockquote><i>Quote from Mazda Mp3</i>
    <b>Does anyone know how much one of these would cost today</b></blockquote><center><hr width="90%"></center><!-- END QUOTE -->

    More then you or i have!
     
  11. Re: shooting brake?

    Rollers used four speed manuals on (probably) all of their old cars. Anyway autos where pretty rare in this period.
     
  12. Re: shooting brake?

    "Shooting Brake" was a British term coined in the 1920s for wooden-bodied luxury station-wagons. The origin of the word stays with the Indian magnates who used cars like this for hunting - if a raging tiger or boar broke the wooden body, it could be quickly and easily repaired :D

    ~Nautilus
     
  13. Re: shooting brake?

    Ladies and gentlemen! It's just ShootingBreak, and indeed English as even AstonMartin used that name like a decade ago and stands for a 3- or 5-door wagon. ShootingBrake makes as much sense as ShootingRim or ShootingClutch though.

    So let's just say that this is a typo
     

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